Page 1713 in Little Garden
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By the same author as Grand Line 3.5
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darkening

darkening




14th Mar 2022, 12:33 AM

Ah, anime, where determination and punching really *really* hard, trumps fancy powers 99% of the time.

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LazerWulf

LazerWulf




14th Mar 2022, 3:03 AM

Ah, D&D, where rolling a Natural 20 trumps many things that the DM tries to throw at you, 99% of the time.

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LazerWulf

LazerWulf




14th Mar 2022, 3:05 AM

As someone who only started playing with 4e, can someone explain "Confirming a Crit" to me? I know enough to figure that's what's going on when Luke rolls a second time, but I've never been clear on the actual mechanics of it.

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Josh the Valiant




14th Mar 2022, 3:33 AM

It's literally "roll again and see if you hit the target, because a 5% chance is too high at my table." It's not as severe as I've heard before, which was "roll again and if it's *another 20* then I'll let you actually do double damage", but still. Bleh. An overcomplication and extra roll to compensate for the fact that 5% on a flat curve is too wild in some perspectives.

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Malroth

Malroth




14th Mar 2022, 5:46 AM

Assuming you're not a crit build where that 5% becomes 55% and every crit gives your whole squad free attacks and added status effects to boot.

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Halosty45

Halosty45




14th Mar 2022, 12:34 PM

In 3.0, using only two non-core books, you could get a critical threat range of 2-20.
(And of course, some number of those crits can do triple damage)

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Captain_Boxers




14th Mar 2022, 7:12 AM

I'm not sure which system the comic uses, but confirming crits is a feature Pathfinder 1st edition, which is a system based off of 3.5 D&D. In that system you can have massive crit ranges, like 18-20 on some weapons or massive multiplers, like all axes get x3 damage, and scythes get x4 iirc. To prevent crits from breaking the game a second roll is required to 'confirm' the crit. You don't have to score another crit, but you do have to hit the target. If you hit, it's a crit and if you miss the original roll stills stands and you hit the foe, but it's just a normal hit, not a crit.

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CrowMagnon




14th Mar 2022, 9:17 AM

The comic is based on 3.5

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Grrys




14th Mar 2022, 10:55 AM

And, as mentioned, Pathfinder 1E is also based on 3.5, as part of the 3.5 OGL, and was originally a 3.5 setting rather than a standalone system. It's still technically compatible with 3.5.

And a massive crit range in Pathfinder would be when you've got a keen weapon, which can have a range as low as 15-20.

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Rudedog

Rudedog




14th Mar 2022, 9:25 AM

Confirming critsin 3rd ed is there to keep extremely unlikely moonshots by players from ruining even more scripted battles than normal RNG funkiness already does. Basically, it puts one final obstacle between battle turning RNG and a ruined desperation story for DMs that don't fudge dice rolls. At least, for the marshals that 3rd ed hates so much. For wizards, there is no second chances when the much higher level BBEG fails their polymorph will save and turns into a frog... because F' guys with swords, am I right, fellow wizards?!

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St_Chef




14th Mar 2022, 9:26 PM
"Improbable"

Too true. I mean how likely is it that the party is going to sneak into the BBEG's heavily guarded office and one of the party members rolls 20, 20, 19...
...
...
The chances were 1. Explosive crits are hilarious when they work too well.

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