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Page 973 in Cocoyashi Village
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Page 973


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Average Rating: 5
Number of people who have voted: 2


By the same author as Grand Line 3.5
Comments:

Z2




13th Mar 2017, 12:54 AM

Guess I'll try one:
Story time! Share a tale about a player deliberately sacrificing some kind of mechanical advantage for the sake of drama.

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SeriousBiz




13th Mar 2017, 8:09 AM

I don't know if this one counts, since it ended up having a distinct mechanical advantage as well, but I once got crap from some more advanced and rules-focused D&D 3.5 players for vehemently refusing to take the feat Cleave for my paladin.

For those who don't know, having Cleave allows the character to try to make an additional melee attack at another adjacent enemy if their regular attack downs the first opponent. It's really useful against several relatively weak opponents, and paves the way for Great Cleave, which allows even the follow-up attacks to be followed up with another attack if the opponent falls from it, basically making the character an unstoppable whirlwind of death against low-HP mooks who try to surround them.

Anyway, I knew of the usefulness of Cleave (and was "helpfully" reminded of it at every frickin' opportunity), but it didn't fit my character concept: My paladin was a super honorable, super focused duelist who always picked one opponent and stuck with them until they were down, as he wanted to feel the weight of every death on his conscience. Having him attack multiple enemies in one round would have screwed up the dramatic impact of every victory, so I basically sacrificed a significant mechanical advantage for the sake of character drama every time I picked a feat.

The result was that I ended up picking feats that gradually made my paladin increasingly overpowered against individual opponents, making him a serious force to be reckoned with whenever we fought solitary opponents with high AC and HP. Once our sorceress started learning useful area effect attacks such as Fireball and Cloudkill, she ended up being the one wiping out mooks left and right anyway, and my paladin could focus on what he did best.

For the record, the majority of our group was fine with a non-optimized playing style, so I wasn't trying to be a dick or anything. Personally, I would have preferred it if our sorceress had picked Grease as one of her spells (it's soooo useful, particularly at lower levels), but she didn't want it, and that was fair enough.

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Halosty45

Halosty45




13th Mar 2017, 12:42 PM

Cleave is really good at low levels, but unless you keep fighting enemies well below appropriate power level, it becomes less and less useful. After a certain level, Great Cleave should never be used, because you shouldn't be fighting anything that can be killed in one hit, though it can still find some use if the enemies are all softened up by some area of effect spells. However, that requires the spells to do enough to get them to the 1-hit level without killing them, which means the spells just didn't do enough damage to begin with.

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Passerby




13th Mar 2017, 3:52 PM

In a one-off DnD 3.5 session, my Troglodyte Ranger got an orb of immense power that several different factions, including members of my team, were waging war over. I decided to just smash the thing and be done with it.

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Super_Big_Mac

Super_Big_Mac




13th Mar 2017, 11:00 PM
"Not quite the same, but..."

So my group is playing Ponyfinder, and my main PC, a Pegasus Rogue named Overwatch, had been traumatized and heartbroken by a Doppelganger, under what I'd misheard as Kara (the Doppelganger Goddess/Queen)'s orders.

So, during a session where I was playing as a secondary character, Lily (a Druid/Necromancer who had a Skeletal Rabbit as a Familiar), we were tasked with delivering some artifacts to a gathering of all the Gods, and Kara was there.

Lily (being Oerwatch's wife), was an expy of Fluttershy and Twilight, being very meek and shy, yet also a well-read scholar, until you made her angry. So, upon seeing Kara, I rolled a Will Save, failed to meet a DC of 20, and had Lily march up and slap her.

This had me rolling the Reincarnation Wheel to see what species Lily would be transformed to, after touching the Queen of Shapeshifters. I rolled a 100.

Normally, this would have turned her into a Clockwork (basically, a robo-pony), but, due to Lily's Druidic nature and the GM deciding that Kara'd be into the ironic punishment, a whole new species was created instead, the Woodwork.

Fundamentally the same as Clockworks, they have a few key differences. Firstly, instead of only one night of "becoming flesh" to reproduce a year, Woodworks bask in the love of their friends and family, and use it to bear fruit, which grow into their young. Also, they have a natural resistance to airborne toxins and smoke and the like, but fire and ice deal more damage. They also produce breathable air, which turned them into an NPC race during our current Space-faring campaign, as they're much more valuable keeping ships full of fresh air and tending to shipbound arboretums.

TL;DR I played for drama and ended up creating a game mechanic.

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CosmicKeyring




15th Mar 2017, 12:22 PM

I ended up starting PvP with the person who made my build work because she tried to assassinate my character's sort-of girlfriend.

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JACK




13th Mar 2017, 5:14 AM

I was looking forward to this moment

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Otaku

Otaku




13th Mar 2017, 9:53 AM
"What Comes Around Goes Around"

Corey shouldn't be too upset; if Luke/Luffy can break it, why does he think a future encounter wouldn't pull the same trick against him?

That's the thing about RPGs; often the rules work both ways and it is only convention (or ignorance) that keeps it from actually happening that way. If you can destroy the enemy's weapon, odds are the GM would just do that to you if you looted it instead. Plus, better to improve your odds of victory and get appropriate game mechanic rewards, which are usually a bit harder to lose.

Granted, I'm used to game systems where a good Reputation is an Advantage worth Character Points. If this was a GURPS game, they could have been the Sword Smasher Pirates instead of the Straw Hats. ;)

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Me




14th Mar 2017, 3:44 AM
"Because Sundering still takes an action"

I suppose that that's true, but Corey is a Swordsman: The DM may very well sunder all of his weapons to leave him defenseless if he so wishes. In 3.5, you can have some impressive characters, sure, but the DM can still dismantle you without any trouble.

The benefit Corey would gain from the sword make actually more sense in this light: It's just another useful backup weapon he wouldn't need to spent resources on. Assuming an opponent actually does go out of his way to sunder every single sword Corey has, having one more sword means one more needed sunder and thus one more wasted action.

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Otaku

Otaku




17th Mar 2017, 12:25 AM

I was trying to stress that when your party members can efficiently destroy the weapon, it probably isn't as great as it first seemed. That doesn't mean it lacks a potent effect, but if it is that easy to break, does the DM even have to try and trash it?

That is an actual question; I'm used to gaming systems where having your weapon break isn't an unheard of result in combat. Especially if you fight like Zoro. Plus, we pretty much know what would have happened to that sword if Zoro had taken it...

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Guest




14th Mar 2017, 11:45 AM

Actually, this exact thing happens down the line and get's better swords because of it.

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Guest




14th Mar 2017, 11:45 AM

Actually, this exact thing happens down the line and get's better swords because of it.

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Braveheart




13th Mar 2017, 10:53 AM
"Literally just yesterday"

My character in 5e has the lifelong dream to create a beastiary, so on occasion he will focus on gathering information rather than killing an enemy. We were up against a group of willow whisps and rather than try to kill them he started by inspecting them, taking notes and trying to communicate with them. It resulted in several pages of his notebook being destroyed and him being brought down to 0. Fortunately the party eliminated them without needing his help and were able to heal back to not dying status.

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Halosty45

Halosty45




13th Mar 2017, 1:52 PM
"Favorite moment"

I'd say this is one of my favorite moments in One Piece... but there's at least one thing in basically every arc that makes me want to say that, so I should really just say "I like this part".

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yarrik




13th Mar 2017, 6:04 PM

Between this and Enies Lobby, Luke has definitely got the Drama down.

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Super_Big_Mac

Super_Big_Mac




13th Mar 2017, 11:12 PM

Luke is a Master Dramatist Or, he will be.

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