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Page 772 in Cocoyashi Village
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Average Rating: 5
Number of people who have voted: 1


By the same author as Grand Line 3.5
Comments:

Raxon

Raxon




27th Nov 2015, 3:05 AM

He doesn't need to ask. He has a feat called out of character intuition. It allows him to use out of character knowledge in character. All it costs him is a slightly increased vulnerability to having his weapons sundered.

But honestly, when is that ever going to come up?

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BakaGrappler




27th Nov 2015, 5:31 AM

He was able to offset that eventually by taking the "Missing Eye" flaw, so it all worked out in the end.

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The Old One




27th Nov 2015, 8:13 PM

Is it actually missing? I thought it was supposed to look like one of mihawk's.

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Raxon

Raxon




27th Nov 2015, 11:13 PM

I'm not sure. He never opens the eye, and has a scar over it.

Then again, it might be a self imposed challenge, a method of training himself. This is the guy who, while almost fatally wounded, decided to go out it the winter snow without a shirt, do a thousand pushups, and go for a swim in the icy saltwater.

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BakaGrappler




27th Nov 2015, 5:30 AM
"Tell a Story: "You're not suppose to know that.""

It's hard for people to NOT have out of character knowledge. It's basic nature for us to try and finagle a better position for ourselves on the board. It's the rare player that can keep Character and Player knowledge separate.

Tell a story about a time when someone at your table was completely unable to keep their OOC knowledge out of the game, or at least failed to cover up that their OOC knowledge was guiding them.

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Raxon

Raxon




27th Nov 2015, 7:34 AM

When I feel like using ooc knowledge, I will roll up a psionic precog with glimpses of the workings of the gods.

"Stop, friends! We must not take the winding mountain path! The master of all is angry, for there is no dew in the mountains. Surely, rocks will fall, and we will all die!"

Basically, it's a guy with medium+1 awareness who does not fully comprehend everything, but gets the gist of things.

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mightyinsect




27th Nov 2015, 10:54 AM

There was this one group back in school... We were playing a viking themed campaign. Great riches, explore the icy north - you know the drill. I was playing a multiclass trickster/priest to the god of thieves (unknown to the characters) social character with mediocre fighting skills while the rest of the party was rather combat oriented. We had been taking turns DMing until then and our new DM was a little more on the power gaming side of the spectrum. He and his likeminded friend (who incidentally was playing the DMs character for the duration fo the campaign) were playing twin Elves (Fighter / Archer i believe).
I was frankly not prepared for how much they would enable each other in their power fantasies. I caught on to it rather quickly though, when the elves found items worth a shitton of gold and items that clearly broke any semblance of balance (bow that lets you shoot twice as fast for a level 3 character anyone?).

Anyway, during the adventure, we stumbled upon some old ruins. They turned out to be the remains of a temple to the old Elven Gods, who had since long gone silent. So our twin elves player (let's call him D) took this huge gem from his stash and placed it on the still standing altar. He actually rp'd a little bit, but it was quite clear that he was setting our DM up for some divine intervention later on. In this setting, offerings are supposed to vanish when accepted. The gem did not. D decided to leave the gem there anyway. As it was already getting dark, we decided to camp on the hillside the ruins were standing on. Come midnight, I snuck out, nicked the gem, buried it nearby and went back to sleep. In the morning D discovered that the gem was missing and gots really mad at me. Both in and out of character. Accusing me of stealing and all that. I argued that maybe the old Elven Gods had accepted his offering. I made all my rolls. He did not. He stills insisted on searching my stuff. Afterwards I retrieved the gem (continuing to ace all rolls) and we were on our way. But D couldn't let this go. The dice said he indeed believed that his offering had been accepted. He however insisted his character would still know it was me and tried to to convince the rest of the party they should plot against me. I had to make our DM intervene so he did not try to kill me outright. He only calmed down a bit after he got his bow of being twice as powerful.
At that point I got a little bit annoyed with the entire situation and decided I would make up for their lack of role playing by being as in character as I could (from my perspective stealing the gem was an act of faith for my coin starved priest). When we eventually arrived at the big ice pyramid we were supposed to explore, we found a magical spot of nature with an actual apple tree, and stairs both up and down. So when we found a big gong on the top of the pyramid I struck it very hard and very in character (high curiosity combined with a silly mindset are not the best traits for dungeon crawling). I was honestly surprised by the army of skeletons coming up the stairs though...
The session ended with me sitting in the tree, chucking apples at the skeletons (my weapon dealt piercing damage) and the rest of the party getting crowded, short of a tpk.
We never played again.

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Rookerx88




1st Dec 2015, 8:28 PM
"Critical Wisdom Failure"

I'm ashamed to admit it took me a full two minutes until I figured out what "dew in the mountains" meant. I have to go back to Geekology 101

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Bluejay Blaze




27th Nov 2015, 10:54 AM

Surprisingly, I've never had a group prone to using OOC knowledge. That, or none of us involved noticed.

I have, however, been part of a group that broke the fourth wall in a different way. It was between a couple quests; we were waiting in an inn for a couple days for our contact to show up. SO our characters, bored, got out some pieces of parchment, carved out some dice, and rolled US as characters to play a game called "Houses and Humans." We gave the DM a bit of a headache.

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meta




27th Nov 2015, 11:36 AM

so you were in a infinite loop?

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Otaku

Otaku




27th Nov 2015, 1:11 PM

I am reminded that I haven't been part of an RPG group in too long because... this is a rerun if you've been reading the comments long enough. >.>

For various reasons, my previous character had been retired and I built a new one for a fairly typical pseudo-medieval fantasy setting in GURPS (3rd Edition, Revised). Previous character was a paladin; this time I went with a mage and because the GM allowed you to take as many Disadvantages as you wanted, while he had a lot of problems, he was magically formidable with a wide assortment of spells he could cast at satisfactory levels.

The players likely assumed I'd have a pretty simple, standard introduction; maybe the next town over, maybe a shared enemy encounter while wandering, etc. While journeying, they happened upon the entrance to a cave and as they approached a large, shadow appeared, assumed a vaguely humanoid shape and in a booming voice commanded them to leave. When they did not it created an orb of flame which then took the shape of a bat and began gliding at them. It was perhaps flashy but definitely not effective; no one was hurt. The thing is, they couldn't hurt the shadow or the bat.

The GM and I agreed to have the players stumble across the camp where my character and his family had been living for a bit. They would then follow usual procedure and hide while my mage would stack several spells to scare away the party. Said spells allowed him to safely and stealthily cast from their hiding place and because they were mostly simpler spells stacked together, he couldn't use his higher level stuff without risk (each spell currently "On" gives a -1 to skill) but it also meant if a single one was temporarily disrupted, the whole thing wouldn't collapse (such as with a high level illusion).

When did player knowledge matter? Well during a break the GM and I had a chance to confer apart from the others and we totally misread the situation. The rest of the group thought they had managed to encounter a "boss monster" out of order and without their new team member. The GM and I thought by now it was so obvious that this had to be an elaborate ruse because again, the party was getting hurt (not even illusory damage) and they couldn't hurt the enemy. We went back and fessed up only to realize we could have keep this going a bit longer until they did figure it out... but of course, once the players knew their characters suddenly got brave and smart and did exactly what they needed to find my character. XD

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TheWizland




27th Nov 2015, 5:02 PM

I'll be honest, I'm guilty of doing this on occasion.
One time we tracked down some villains who were planning to resurrect a villain known as Nei Keistra that we killed several hundred years ago or so (it's a long story). We followed them down to an ancient catacomb. While my team was fighting the villains, I was investigating the area and found the crown of the dead king of this city.
So I think, hey, I'll pick up this crown, but the GM asks if I directly touch the crown. At which point I promptly change my mind.
After some shenanigans, Keistra was resurrected. I promptly said "Screw it" and put on the crown. I had to make a Will save but I got control of a magical aura granted by the crown, which manifested itself into about a hundred swords. In the meantime an ally immobilized Keistra with magical tendrils. Needless to say, Keistra died.

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Omury




29th Nov 2015, 12:18 AM

It was a failed campaign that one of my friends ran. I was a Kender cleric/rouge. Kender have sticky little fingers and a lack of knowledge of right and wrong/personal space and ownership, so I lifted something small from one of my friends characters. It was small and wouldn't make much of a difference in the long run and passed my sleight of hand check, but he called me out on it so he rolled a sense motive check against my bluff check, I won.

He then, in character, called me a thief and tried to tell the other characters how much of a thief I was, while I used the Kender excuse of it just fell in (Which is what his character was supposed to believe) and my friend (who got me into tabletop gaming) was the only person to believe my side of the story (it also helps that he also understands the Dragonlance setting) and agreed with me.

He got his item back but his character never trusted me for being a thief and constantly made references to it later on in the session and the next session. We stopped after the second.

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9652769




28th Nov 2015, 4:02 PM
"There an artifact for that."


Sliver of the Amalgam Mind
This tiny, clear crystal is part of a great otherworldy device that shattered long ago. Alone, the splinter—hardly longer than a fingernail—has no power. If brought into contact with another splinter, however, both turn the same color. Should these slivers then be inserted into the skin of sentient individuals, those bearing the shards can telepathically communicate with any other creature pierced by a shard of the same color within line of sight. This telepathy allows those participating to hear only what others bearing the slivers wish them to hear, and to broadcast only what they wish. A bearer has complete control over this telepathy and can block it out or only broadcast to specific individuals as she wishes.

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Ben Wilder




29th Nov 2015, 8:39 AM

So thought-speak from Animorphs?

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D3agle




28th Nov 2015, 7:07 PM

In one campaign I was in, we had an interesting way around OOC-Knowledge. My character was a thrallherd of not inconsiderable power, and he would use mindlinks to communicate telepathically with the rest of the party. As soon as something happened to one of us, everyone else knew at the speed of thought. Based on the way the DM and I read the power, each mindlink was routed through my character, so theoretically I could control what characters learned what and when. Never actually came up, campaign ended too quickly, but I liked the possibilities it gave me.

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Disloyal Subject

Disloyal Subject




30th Nov 2015, 2:35 PM

The one and only pony campaign I played in had a character like that. Coordinating improvised subterfuge got a lot more difficult when he dropped out.

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