Page 678 in The Baratie
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Average Rating: 5
Number of people who have voted: 2


By the same author as Grand Line 3.5
Comments:

IsaiahOmega




25th Mar 2015, 12:26 AM

Ah yes the clang can't wait to see the reaction after that

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BakaGrappler




25th Mar 2015, 1:13 AM
"Tell a Story: About The Time The GM Totally Saved Your Ass"

Let me tell you a little secret. The GM is actually on your side.

The GM constructs challenges in the most insidious manner he is capable of. He intentionally makes enemies designed to own you face. He gleefully cackles as you fall into his traps.

But aside from the occasional power mad moron, the GM WANT'S you to succeed. Which is why he'll occasionally remind you of some life saving THING you forgot about, totally saving your ass.

Tell a Story about when your GM reminded you of something you did, could do, or had done, that totally saved your bacon.

Because the GM is not the bad guy. He's just likes to dabble in villainy.

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Storyteller




25th Mar 2015, 2:13 AM

Sure... Here's a story... I AM the GM. I often need to remind my players of powers they possess or of information they've learned. Even when I do my damnedest to kill them, it's because breezing through a campaign is no fun.

My Fiance has thus far played Mage characters in nWoD. I spend about half my time in a game reminding her just what types of spells she can cast.

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Tess




25th Mar 2015, 2:45 AM

The GM metagamed for me. My character had entered a magic tower/school. It was one so potent that there was only one door, but there was a dial besides the door that could send you almost anywhere. I had gone in to look for the others and failed a crucial roll. I went up against a blood beast, an undead construct thing that was intended to spank the whole party. He dicked with time and the rest of the party to get them there after being forced to spend an entire session just to almost kill me with it.

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Zilfallion

Zilfallion




25th Mar 2015, 4:59 PM

... I usually memorize pretty much everything my character is capable of. I'm the impartial rules lawyer/optimizer of my group. I do practically the complete opposite of this when I'm playing. Rather than the GM reminding me of something I could do. I'm usually reminding the GM of things that could further harm me. Like recently when I was flying around in a tornado briefly. I was the one who reminded the GM I'm taking nonlethal damage from the blown-away effect of a failed Fly check. [I got about half way through the Tornado, had 31 nonlethal damage on me, decided to go to ground].

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Videospirit




26th Mar 2015, 12:27 AM

My group hates when I help the dm, so I've limited to doing it only when he asks.

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Zilfallion

Zilfallion




26th Mar 2015, 8:10 AM

That's why you should do it in secret, with note passing, or private messages, or texts, depending on your method of play. They'll never know...

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TridenT




8th Apr 2016, 8:10 PM
"Mercy"

I was GM of my group for a short bit, but right as I took the reigns our group's "that guy" found out about the game and joined in, and promptly made an idiot fightan guy.

Not far down the line, the group encountered a wild pair of owlbears, doing owlbear stuff, and the fight got pretty thick, and one of them got this new character dead to rights, proned him, landed two attacks to knock him below 0, and with owlbears we all know what that means - bite attack!

But I'm not an experienced GM. And I like the group story telling more than the adversarial nature of gameplay. So I spared him. The owlbear "was distracted by the other combatants", which is weak sauce. The very moment I said it I knew I'd screwed up, and felt bad about it the rest of the night. I immediately got a look from our most experienced group GM, because he knew, and he knew that I knew. I just kinda mouthed "I know" at him and shook my head.

My single greatest GMing regret.

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DeS_Tructive

DeS_Tructive




25th Mar 2015, 8:14 AM

In this case, I was the GM in a covert ops superhero group.
The group was trying to infiltrate their base, which was controlled by a group of hostile organisations. They had infiltrated the base by teleporting into the training area, almost drowned because the swimming pool one area higher had flooded into it, and -barely- made it to the hallways.
They discovered the bomb on a doorway, which was triggered by motions sensors. I was expecting the technopath to convince it that exploding was a -really- bad idea, but nope, they instead decided to disarm it by... smashing it.

Our healer/precog, who had been warning them that it was a bad idea from the beginning (danger sense, ftw), got brought down to exactly 0 life. So I leaned back, let the group check all options and mourn her loss for about ten minutes before:
"Don't you have reactive mutation? If you roll good enough, adding in karma points and force, it should give you enough soak to survive."
She got out with 3 health.

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kidra

kidra




25th Mar 2015, 9:48 AM
"gm save"

Well he let me get resurrected for free. I think he felt bad though cuz only half the party ended up fighting the ogre that killed me, so that fact that we beat it at all at that level was impressive.

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Raxon

Raxon




25th Mar 2015, 3:00 PM

I suppose letting me find an infinite wand of healing would count. Saved my arse a few times in combat, even if it did only heal 5 hp. I stole it from a compartment in a particularly nasty clay golem, who autohealed a decent chunk of its hp every turn. The fact I was allowed to take it was probably the GM being very nice.

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Zilfallion

Zilfallion




26th Mar 2015, 1:16 PM

One thing that I've found interesting is the fact that you could create a use-activated/command word wondrous item of Cure Light Wounds for 1800 gold. It would have an infinite number of charges. Sure it's not great incombat healing, but if you have a couple minutes between combats, your party would be right back up to full. Although having it slotless would bump the price up to 3600 gold. Still well worth the cost imo and completely within the rules.

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Guest




26th Mar 2015, 3:41 PM

Uh, that 1800 GP cost is for an item that only works once per day. Even being generous and making one that only works 10 times per day doubles that to 3600 GP, 20 uses becomes 7200 GP, and so forth. At 50 uses per day, the price is now 18000 GP (36000 for a slotless item), that only heals 1d8+1 a pop. Still think it's worth it? In comparison, 50 potions comes to only 2500 GP.

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Guest




26th Mar 2015, 3:43 PM

Same guest. Er, sorry. The 1800 GP item works 5 times per day. The other numbers are still good though.

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Zilfallion

Zilfallion




26th Mar 2015, 7:21 PM

I'm not seeing where you're finding the only 5 charges per day. Yes, you can make an item HAVE only a few charges per day to lower the price, but that wouldn't be applied in this case as far as I know. I've read the section fairly thoroughly, and nowhere does it mandate that the Charges Per Day effect be applied to all command-word activated items.

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Guest




28th Mar 2015, 6:49 PM

You're technically right. Nowhere does it say that you must apply the charges per day limitation to an item. However, it does give examples of loopholes of people trying to gain unlimited spell effects via command activated or continuous use items. One example given is a mace that has continuous true strike, which by the table would only cost 2000 GP for a permanent +20 to hit. And a +5 enhancement costs 50,000, so the suggestion to the GM is to price the item at 200,000 instead for comparable value.

It's one of those things that a GM would pretty much say no to immediately. But hey, if your GM allows it, more power to you. Just remember that it works both ways, and low CR mobs are also given these inexpensive options.

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SeriousBiz




25th Mar 2015, 10:08 AM

Last time I GM'd, I was running a homebrew horror campaign. I ran a single player session where one of the players was alone, stuck in a mysterious village whose inhabitants, as it turned out, were something not quite human.

As the horror started to unravel, the player did the only wise thing they could think of: they ran. I had foreseen that, and placed several obstacles preventing just that. They would not leave just now, I still had some story left! But like any creative player, they managed to avoid my traps by finding a third option every time. I was seriously impressed. Finally, they were climbing down a mountain to escape the pursuing villagers. That's when they failed a climb check. And another to regain their balance. And another to grab on to a ledge that I decided was right underneath them. They were falling fast now.

Even though the nature of the game was "anyone can die", I really, really did not want their character to die. Not now. Not like this. Not after some spectacularly clever decisions that took me totally by surprise and forced me to improvise. Not because of a couple of really, really bad rolls in a row.

Things looked hopeless. But then I remembered that the player had forgotten to use one of their daily "lucky" rerolls, a feature in the homebrew game I was running, and I immediately reminded them of that. One successful roll later, I ruled that they managed to grab on to some small branches growing out of the rock and slow down their fall. They still broke their leg and lost consciousness for several hours, but they were alive and had managed to escape.

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Yuko Hoon

Yuko Hoon




25th Mar 2015, 11:42 AM

I am GM for Fading Suns. The thing is, I'm not a experienced GM, so I'm mostly trying different types of final bosses to get some challenge for the group. Because of that, I always prepare some safe-fails in case the enemy is too strong. After three battles like that, I would have hoped for them to catch up on the fact that there's always *something* around to help them.

As a player... Well, the most recent is the time when an ogre nearly killed my poor catfolk samurai with a critical, and the GM reminded me that I had this beautiful feat called "Black Cat" that allowed me to make him reroll a dice once per day. The critical turned into a failed roll and my samurai managed to beat the ogre to an inch of his life.

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