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Page 600 in The Baratie
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Average Rating: 5
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By the same author as Grand Line 3.5
Comments:

Tokoz




22nd Sep 2014, 12:05 AM
"This time I will get it right."

Story time! Tell a story about when you and your group, or your players, ended up beating an apparently incredibly difficult challenge with a stupidly simple maneuver.

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Tokoz




22nd Sep 2014, 12:15 AM

My friend and I were running a short two person campaign to test out another friend's campaign world. Both of us tended to be clever assholes, so we were good beta-testers. Anyway, at one point, we end up with the typical "Take down this guy's organization" quest. The kicker is, it's just the two of us, we have a pretty small timelimit, and the head honcho can't die.

What ends up happening is this. My character, using the Magus class, but swapping guns for swords and nerfing a few abilites to compensate, had an idea. This was a wild west style world, and he had craft magic item. We asked the NPC contact if they knew of any lycanthropes nearby. We managed to track one down, and the DM went to decide what kind he was. Turns out, the animal in question was to be a chicken.

After the initial facepalming and sighing, we managed to get the guy to let us be there while he transformed, and took some samples. One magic item brewing later, and we have curse bullets that can force someone to save or become a Lycanthrope. We head back, get all set up, and wait for the guy's next public appearance.

To make things short, I hit him, causing a massive squawking chicken to replace the dignified gang leader, my partner uses our new bag of holding to rob his vault, and we get the hell out of town as every other gang, including a bloody cult, start ripping the town apart. Ironically, the NPC was under the impression that us just killing a bunch of people was a bad idea, and embarrassing him would work much better.

As we rode away from the rising pillars of smoke, and clucking of the were-chickens, we collectively agreed that next time, we'd take the slow and painful route over quick and stupid.

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L




22nd Sep 2014, 12:22 AM

I've got a two for one special for you guys.

Our Pathfinder group used to have a player who played Link from The Legend of Zelda...as a grimdark kind of character.

He wasn't very keen on things like religion or anything relating to that.

This included holidays, such as Christmas.

So, when our group decided to make and play a Christmas-themed module for the current game we were all in, he immediately refused to participate and asked that the GM keep Link from getting injured, harmed, killed, or have any damage come to him while he was "away". The GM agreed, and assured Link's player that he would be a man of his word.

He decided to afflict Link with a condition known as "AFK", which made him frozen solid, stiff as a board, and needing to be carried around by the party everywhere they went.

Why he didn't just have him vanish until the end of the module, I'll never know.

In any case, during the module, one of our party members-a knight-won a drinking contest that gave him a mug that let him get a +2 on any drinking contest rolls in the future. He also gained the ability to magically enforce any wagers made in drinking contests he won.

Both of these things-the mug and Link-soon became pivotal in this module.

At one point, we encountered a giant bear mini-boss. The bear was sentient and very polite, but intent on fighting us. The knight quickly challenged him to a drinking contest, having the bear agree to join the party if it lost. To the best of my memory, the GM rolled 20, and the knight rolled 19. The GM was starting to gloat, until someone in the Skype chat pointed out that the knight still had the +2.

The mid-boss had joined our party.

In the next room over, we encountered a room that had two bells on a large square, with smaller squares inside. My character-a samurai-decided to try to push one of the bells onto another square. He was shocked by a sudden burst of electricity. In the middle of trying to figure out the puzzle in the least likely-to-kill-me-way possible, I remembered the conversation Link's player had with the GM.

I proceeded to pick Link up, and push the second bell onto another square. A giant sawblade came out of the ceiling...and bounced off of Link. Because of the GM's promise, Link was now indestructible and the perfect anti-trap tool. Puzzle: solved.

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Raxon

Raxon




22nd Sep 2014, 3:47 AM

"I place an explosive rune on my staff of power and toss the staff to him. I yell 'Hey! You'll need this! Catch!'"

"What?"

"And when he looks at the rune on it, the rune explodes, breaking the staff."

"WHAT!?!?"

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Solokov




22nd Sep 2014, 5:49 AM

...but....what was the challenge.. there seems to be some context mising. Not that I have any poroblem with this, I'm going to use this trick the next time I need to mess with someone in party, but still what was the point of it all?

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Raxon

Raxon




22nd Sep 2014, 7:33 AM

Oh, right, sorry.

Level six party, facing down a pit fiend. Just a single pit fiend. I mean, there were eight of us, but we really were no match for that, even with our massively overpowered equipment. Two paladins, a ranger, a wizard, a sorcerer, two clerics, and a fighter.

The fighter and the druid went down in the first round.

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Malroth




22nd Sep 2014, 3:20 PM

When you're fighting Pit fiends at Lv6 throw on all the cheese you can. You're lucky he diddn't open with Blasphemy. For any party less than lv 15 its an instant no save TPK

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Guest




23rd Sep 2014, 8:57 PM

A staff of power has stats as a +2 quarterstaff, being a 2-handed hafted weapon. It has a base hardness of 5, increased by 4 for being a +2 weapon, and a base hp of 10, increased by 20 for being a +2 weapon.
Explosive runes deals a maximum of 36 energy damage before hardness. Even if the DM ruled that force damage was not halved against the staff, it would deal at most 27 damage to the staff after subtracting its hardness, not enough to destroy it. Even if your by now surprisingly permissive DM ruled that it ignored hardness and was not halved, you only have a cumulative 1.97% chance of rolling 30 or higher for damage.

Of course, Rule of Cool does much, but your example wouldn't work without the DM being on your side one way or the other.

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Raxon

Raxon




23rd Sep 2014, 9:46 PM

I had some homebrewed metamagic feats that boosted the power of explosive runes, and the pit fiend was intended to be there to block our way. The explosive rune dealt 50 damage out of a possible 72. However, two party members charged in, so naturally, we were engaged in the fight, too. The pit fiend was supposed to be one of the end bosses. After we beat him, we got access to epic level gear and loot inside. There were these fantastic sets of armor. Ten sets of each, cloth, leather, chain, and full plate. There were also large chests full of all sorts of small enchanted gems. A wall full of weapons, and each of us could take one. It was literally an epic level armory. For a full army. No money, but armor, weapons, and gear we totally should not have had.

Each weapon had slots that you could plug the gems into. Each of us could customize our weapons with additional effects. I got a staff that allowed me to cast magic missile five times in a round, and they were automatically maximized, quickened, enhanced, and a slew of other metamagic enhancements. And that's a free action, five times per turn. The armor had these slots, too. For the hell of it, I gave my cloth robes a +8 stacking AC bonus, plus protection from arrows, and a 50% resistance to fire, ice, lightning, and sonic.

I also found some spell scrolls, and a tome that increased my int by 3 just from reading it. And you know what? All of this freaking terrified me. Because the DM had shown that whenever we got nice things, we would need them to face a major challenge. Now we're level seven(we got a major xp boost from killing a pit fiend), and we're decked out in stuff meant for dudes three times out level.

Heck, we only just barely handled the guys that were meant to be minions with the pit fiend.

In other words, I spent a month game time, just identifying the enchantments on everything in that armory. It pretty much just went like this.

"You spent a month identifying everything. Here's a list of everything in the armory." There were so many accessories, too. The defender paladin got his AC up into the mid 70s with all the stacking bonuses he racked up, and he had a DR of 15. He dual wielded these shields with switchblade swords that sprung out of then, adamantine and silver. The ranger, once he was rezzed, had a bow with an effective range of ten miles, with enhanced accuracy, allowing for up to three rerolls with the option to choose the top roll. The bow dealt 5d20 and +10 force damage.

The druid got a stick. It was a very nice stick.

Let me reiterate. We were all level seven when we got this. A warning to DMs, do not put things like this in a game, and expect players to come back later for the loot. They will find a way to defeat that pit fiend, and loot the epic level armory.

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Malroth




23rd Sep 2014, 11:26 PM

Or all die in the first round trying to take it and then harbor a grudge forever.

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Disloyal Subject

Disloyal Subject




25th Sep 2014, 4:09 AM
"Grudges"

Characters holding grudges is fine, and to be expected - fun, even. Players holding grudges? Not so much.
Stupid solutions to problems? Well, it doesn't really measure up, but...
After encountering far too many Monstrous Creatures of Tyranid Hive Fleet Nidhoggr on the long-abandoned planet Audax-2, we were making progress towards the archeotech cache we'd spent the whole campaign tracking down. We were all wounded & burnt after a fight with a Balor-class Hive Tyrant that went south, and our grenadier was a stabilized charred, eyeless husk being carried by the combat specialist. In short, we were in no condition to fight. So when we heard chittering up ahead & rolled for initiative, and I won - +11 in a d10 system means I usually do - I noted that they were tightly grouped on a narrow walkway charging us, and decided to toss a grenade to use up all their dodge attempts for the round at once so we could shoot them in peace. One max-damage (barring crits) explosion later, and combat was ended, but we were missing 20 feet of walkway that we rather needed.

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MarcusOTerra




23rd Sep 2014, 12:26 AM

The whole party got swallowed whole by a titanic dragon.

We then procedded to use magic shovels (and a power stunt use of 'create pit') to DIG OUR WAY OUT OF THE DRAGON.

Needless to say, having that many holes in you kills even a dragon, specially when their magic.

For the record, our caster sussed that a Dragon's SR is in the outside of the scales, not the undersides.

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yo go re




22nd Sep 2014, 3:32 PM
"the Elmer Fudd effect"

In a police campaign, a group of officers are in a physical brawl with two crooks in their warehouse hideout, and we needed one alive to interrogate. We'd taken one out, but the other either had blindfight or was incredibly lucky, because even after getting blinded by a spell, he was still holding us off.

His half of the fight was taking place on a raised balcony (the other crook had been down at ground level). So, from the ground, a character calls "this way is clear, follow me" imitating the dead partner. The bluff roll was high enough (and the blind crook was so disoriented) that he trusts the command, turns, and runs straight off the edge of the platform, breaking his legs when he lands. Just like that, we had someone to interrogate!

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xuincherguixe

xuincherguixe




22nd Sep 2014, 7:37 PM

Had mentioned this one briefly before, but...

So in the vampire campaign we're fighting a powerful Tremere. Wizard vampire basically. Important character. Big challenge. Kind of a climatic encounter. He (fittingly) transforms into a creature of living fire.

Our warrior is swinging his sword uselessly. Our own Tremere is trying to buff himself. I'm playing a social/ranged character, and my friend had a similar build. Only I was playing a magnificent bastard for justice!

Anyways since it's not like our weapons are going to hurt it, he gets the idea to toss his gunpowder bag itself into the mage. Which exploded. And injured it. But not enough to finish it off.

Since there's nothing I can really do, I go ahead and do the same as well.

And that's how we roflstomped the ancient powerful elder vampire.

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Sutremaine




22nd Sep 2014, 8:29 PM
"Werechickens are no laughing matter..."

It might sound silly, but chickens are surprisingly vicious. They love mice and blood. Imagine the Compsognathus from The Lost World, but bigger and filled with lycanthropic madness.

Also, what kind of chicken? Malays are proper dinosaur-looking birds, but Orpingtons are giant feather dusters. It'd be like making a weretribble.

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Anvildude




22nd Sep 2014, 11:56 PM

What? That chicken's like, 50% drumstick! That's awesome!

How comest thou to know so much about chicken?

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Sutremaine




23rd Sep 2014, 1:44 PM

I'm doing research for getting some. The different breeds are attractive, but I'd like to adopt some ex-battery hens. They need some love in their lives.

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Disloyal Subject

Disloyal Subject




25th Sep 2014, 3:22 PM
"Chickens"

I'm fond of Orpingtons and Cochins for eggs. Barnevelders are supposed to be great for laying year-round, but ours don't. Faverolles are alright, and also floofy and huggable - plus they've shown enough of a vicious streak that I'm planning on crossbreeding them with Azils , the most fearless and dinosaurian chickens I know of, and attempting to train guard/attack chickens. (And by 'fearless,' I don't mean blood-crazed - they're fearsome, but mellow, and humans don't even seem to register on their threat-radar. Pick one up, and they'll just look at you like "Oh, hey. 'Sup?"
For brooding eggs, I rely on Cochins, Azils, and Chanticleers. Orloffs aren't bad either.

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Tokoz




23rd Sep 2014, 1:06 AM

It coulda gone poorly for us. The werechicken charged me, I managed to dodge, and the DM goes to say something, then pauses. "Weren't you in front of the door?" The solid metal reinforced door. Chicken knocks himself out and we just take samples. So, we never really checked the breed.

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Lord Zecron




23rd Sep 2014, 12:40 AM
"Blitzles gonna blitz"

So I run a Pokemon Tabletop campaign and I decided to have the evil organization use genetically enhanced pokemon hybrids to Take Over The World. And these things are monsters. The one I had would have one hit KOed each pokemon they could have thrown at it. So I have it charge up an attack and when I roll damage I get 100 even, which would have put them well below fainting. Then out of nowhere, one of my players uses an interupt action to switch out his level 7 blitzle (and by this point everyone was using level 15 or highre and th eboss was basically level thirty) with the lightning rod ability. SO now it's immune to all electric attacks and is auto targeted by them. And my boss only had electric moves.

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Malroth




23rd Sep 2014, 5:34 AM

Only Electric Moves? Really? Have you never heard of Type coverage? Always assume your opponent has something that can tank your best moves.

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Neon Vincent




8th Nov 2014, 1:13 AM

My fighter was in a dungeon with the cauldron of rebirth from The Black Cauldron, the one that raises an undead army. After fighting a couple of the zombie soldiers that kept scrambling back into the cauldron to revive themselves and defeating them by burning them completely, the party had to destroy the cauldron. We hit it with our weapons, we cast spells on it, we even tried to freeze it after heating it up. Nothing. In pure frustration, my fighter started beating it with my bare hands. The DM asked "What's your strength?" "18." "The cauldron cracks." So I continued to smash into pieces with my fist. We succeeded.

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