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Page 597 in The Baratie
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Page 597


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Average Rating: 5
Number of people who have voted: 3


By the same author as Grand Line 3.5
Comments:

Jubilee




15th Sep 2014, 12:12 AM

That's kind of clever.

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DiZ




15th Sep 2014, 3:34 PM

That's actually very clever. Canon Luffy wouldn't be able to rationalize that with even half the coherency that Luke just did. If he even realized his own genius at all.

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xuincherguixe

xuincherguixe




15th Sep 2014, 2:30 AM

I think I can remember a couple times I outsmarted the game master.


Back when I was playing on a Shadowrun MUSH I was busting into the house of the sort of person who would be the title character of a Slasher movie. There's this slide of death. Like the kind you'd see in a playground. Only it's all greased up and there's spikes, and saw blades, and poison. It's a real death trap. So I smash through the floor.

The GM did not expect this.

It honestly seemed like a very natural solution. I was a playing an absurdly strong character, I had a good melee weapon. There's really overt and obvious danger. I'm a Shadowrunner. Part of being one means solving problems creatively.

Most of the mission was the slide of death, so it was hilariously one sided in our favor.

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xuincherguixe

xuincherguixe




15th Sep 2014, 2:33 AM

In a homebrew D&D campaign I was in, we somehow managed to keep going off the rails despite it being run in such a way that it didn't have rails to begin with!

I've told the story about how I defeated a troll single handedly 4 CR above me, so I won't repeat that one.

In one of the background scenes (what led your PC to become an adventurer anyways?)... I was in a gang of guttersnipes. Street Orphans. Stealing things because we were poor. Turns out a heist goes bad. Turns out the town guard was supposed to kill one of the lead orphans. But I alerted my partner in crime and so he was able to escape. Turns out this made later events difficult because I wasn't supposed to have strong attachments and I could just go adventure later.


At one point our other wizard was in a suspicious place. So he casts detect magic. It's a tactic he had learned from playing after years. Kind of an obvious one.

Turns out we found a place that was set up with various contingency plans for if goblins invade. (They had in the past) We only find out about THAT later. We missed this stuff the first time. (Mostly the DM slipped with the information they gave.) We stopped the Goblin attacks, but it nagged at us that we were missing whatever that "magic thing" was at the monument. Turns out there was a spirit. Impression of the wizard who set the thing up. Answered questions. We got some equipment and spells. And powered up our Bard (he gained a template)

Not sure if it really counts because it wasn't so much a plan... but we go around investigating. Goblins saw us doing this so they sent a hit squad. My Horse/Zebra crossbreed noticed and killed one. Another was hiding close by and so we interrogated him. Or tried to. Wasn't really something capable of advanced critical thinking.

We decide to investigate a place, and a Goblin scout comes and starts having a talk. He informs us that it turns out there actually is no real threat. The goblins are pathetic. They're being manipulated by an evil druid. They're just going to get themselves killed. The two that attacked us? They were the best warriors. It's just the villains want to stretch out the kingdoms forces while they conquer it.

Since I had said this much, may as well explain how the Goblin campaign ends. We decide to stage a coup. The scout? He gets to be the new chief. The current one is assassinated. We go in invisible. The scout talks to some people, arranges a bit of a distraction. No one spots us that would cause issue. We had this whole thing planned out where we'd all open fire and take the chief out, but it turns out I one shot him with a full attack. The Druid is captured. We don't learn much. It was a bit of a weird encounter. Honestly I never was able to understand his motivations or goals.

Two things bother me. He was sent to the capital for further investigation, but we were not there. There was potential for escape. He did have connections after all.

The other is he said that the Goblin Scout was working with him. It's more plausible that he was using magic to spy on us, and he heard us saying as much.

Hoping we get back to that game so we can find out though. I hate when things are left unresolved like that!


It may not have been my plan, but through my actions I did convince the DM that I really have to be a Wizard. They're sort of a big deal in this setting. Rare. You have to be a certain kind of person.

Which I apparently was. And the character was also an investigator. He would come across spell books at some point. Chances are the spell casting thing he could learn.

In the end he found the wizards guild. By following a chain of evidence. There were magical defenses, but I was able to bypass a lot of them being Lawful Good. And in their defense? Worked out for them. I think I'm the only Wizard associated with the guild with a positive strength modifier. They could do some field research they couldn't before. Safer to watch magic bears with a guy who can swing around a Zweihänder.

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Raxon

Raxon




15th Sep 2014, 2:43 AM

Outsmarting the DM? Without getting him drunk, or fast talking?

I think this is straining the limits of believability, DT.

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xuincherguixe

xuincherguixe




15th Sep 2014, 3:22 AM

Having thought about it, how much of a problem ARE rail roading GMs? I look back at my experiences and realize most of mine were pretty cool about this sort of thing.

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Malroth




15th Sep 2014, 4:39 AM

It can be pretty bad especially if the DM thinks they're smarter or more creative than everybody else, Read DM of the Rings to get a good idea of what the worst 30% or so of GM's can be like.

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xuincherguixe

xuincherguixe




15th Sep 2014, 5:12 AM

I'm familiar with DM of the rings. I had a pretty bad experience myself awhile back (did a post about two weeks ago I think it was). Let's just say I was tempted to gift them "The Stanley Parable" on Steam. That's how hard I had my agency denied.

I'm a little skeptical about how common an occurrence being rail roaded hard is.

I kind of wish I was in more bad games so I'd have more excuses to act stupid and arbitrary.

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The Old One




16th Sep 2014, 12:38 PM

DM of the Rings is a good example. Chainmail Bikini is a somewhat more extreme example of Railroading GMs

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Inbetweenaction




15th Sep 2014, 8:11 AM

It's mosty a problem when doing a premade campaign. DMs do tend to try to railroad you into being abel to play the rest of the campaign.

In a resent game, we where SUPPOSED to be found guilty of vandalizing and destroying a church. but due to me playings smart character whom was very knowledge oriented, i destroyed every single piece of evidence, using in character knowledge.

In the end, i had managed to prove to the court that the only way we could have done the crime, was if we broke the laws of nature and magic, and that in such a case, we should be charged with the crime of being GODS...

or the city's police force and justice system was so fundamentally incompetent that they had no business ordering our execution and should give us every single resources at their disposal so a competent team of investigators could try to find the truly guilty.

But the plot said that we had to be found guilty, so when my warrior culture friends decided that they would prefer to die in battle rather than meekly walking to the gallows like a lambs before slaughter, and my poison master martial artist doctorate had undeniable proof that the system was in dire need of his services (he never got that church they owned him), we where forced to abandon the entire campaign.

Seriously, whom writes a scenario where you are supposed to NOT fight certain death?

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Inbetweenaction




15th Sep 2014, 8:17 AM

Sure, it probably didn't help that we tried to set up a biding war between the forces of good and evil over a major magical artifact (we only knew it was magical, and expensive looking, but still. we where a band of chaotic mercenaries, we simply expected to get payed. and then maybe offering a contract to the losing bidder). If ether side would have just payed us, (stupid good guys not paying like they where supposed to)

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Halosty




15th Sep 2014, 12:03 PM

That doesn't *sound* like good guys. Maybe they were bad guys in disguise. If there were any paladins involved you should call for their immediate loss of status.

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Disloyal Subject

Disloyal Subject




16th Sep 2014, 3:11 AM

Sure, it's dickish, but most paladins I've encountered would be perfectly okay with confiscating a powerful artefact from an unpredictable band of mercenaries, especially if they'd openly considered selling it to the forces of evil. Lawful Good ≠ reasonable.

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terrycloth




15th Sep 2014, 2:00 PM

We just had that problem (only not as bad) in a superhero campaign. We were supposed to all be captured and put in a deathtrap, but our mentalist systematically mind-controlled and then mind-blasted the team that was supposed to defeat us without them even noticing that she was a threat, because mental powers are OP that way.

So the GM is trying to have us walk into the location where we would have escaped from the deathtrap by various means, but without us actually being in the trap none of that part of the module really worked right...

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xuincherguixe

xuincherguixe




15th Sep 2014, 8:11 PM

@Inbetweenaction Sometimes I come across some writing and I'm thinking. "This is a person who doesn't understand games." I think you found an instance of this.

Writing for a game is different than for prose, and I think a lot of people fail to realize that. Your story as a writer? Doesn't actually matter. This is THEIR story, and they're writing it through their actions.

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A Munchkin




16th Sep 2014, 2:41 AM

I played under a particular DM for a pathfinder game... based off of a video game. I think it was Dragon Warrior 4 or something. Anyways, the maps were nice and while he didn't railroad us as hard as he could have, I got told time and time again that I couldn't fly over things (my character had wings) or that a spell that WOULD work to get past an obstacle that in game required a certain item... let's just say I got pissed a lot that half of my spells were useless. Even our rogue character found that he'd wasted skill points in disable device.

Obviously, when this DM approached me about a game based off of Chrono Trigger... I declined.

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Porphyrogenitus




16th Sep 2014, 10:19 PM

One of the more recent examples of outsmarting the GM (in this case, the premade writers more than the live GM) was toward the beginning of our recent Dark Heresy campaign.

My Techpriest was armed with a plasma pistol and a lot of intelligence and knowledge. While assisting a crew of Inquisitorial Stormtroopers in an assault on a heretical lord's mansion, the party infiltrated via a secret tunnel while the main force attacked head-on.

After a variety of encounters we finally made our way to the big bad's lair, a garden under a huge decorative dome made of stained armor-glass. He, along with some nasty xeno dog analogues, was standing on a hill under the center of the dome.

Using a bit of intellectual know-how, my Techpriest quickly calculated the stresses on the dome and found the correct point of aim, all while the big bad was busy going through his canned spiel.

One plasma shot later, and the entire dome collapsed in shards of jagged armor-glass, quite literally cutting off the speech in a shower of death.

So many canned adventures have these big set-piece boss fights, often involving a villain monologue, and in far too many of them there is an obvious way to preempt the entire battle during the opening lines of the speech. It's great when you have a GM who is willing to play along, and frustrating when you have one who insists in the sanctity of "narrative time."

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xuincherguixe

xuincherguixe




16th Sep 2014, 11:36 PM

Heh. I feel like shooting enemies while they give speeches is kind of like using exploits in a video game. The writer slipped up.

But it's also hilarious.

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