Page 1554 in Whiskey Peak
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Average Rating: 5
Number of people who have voted: 3


By the same author as Grand Line 3.5
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BakaGrappler




8th Feb 2021, 12:56 AM
"Tell a Story: Accidentally Crushed"

Sometimes the confrontation does not go the way the GM or the player expects. As in, things ended up being TOO one sided of a beat down.

Share a time when the intent was for something to be an even match between players and adversaries, but ended up just being completely lopsided in favor of one or the other.

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BakaGrappler




8th Feb 2021, 1:17 AM

I'll go first this time. This is a story that was told to me by my buddy, about why his name in his listing in the cell phones of his gaming buddies is "Lizard Fucker Ben."

Ben was new to D&D and make a swashbuckling rogue, but put his CHA into Charm, with none in Bluff. He'd been in the game a few sessions when the other new players needed to be introduced. So, on a deserted island (except for the Naga), the party finds the new players bound and about to be sacrificed / cooked for dinner by the Naga tribe. So, a rescue with a following battle was the GM's plan for the evening. The Naga Chief was the boss, and boy was it intimidating.

So, the plan was broadly; split the party, make a distraction, rush in and save the PCs, book it outta there, regroup before having a boss fight (or hopefully avoiding one).

In reality...

The Mage or whatever could control fire rolled WAY too well, causing the bonfire to explode in a giant mass of flames, killing a bunch of Naga and lighting the village on fire. Using the "distraction," two members including the Charming Swashbuckler run in to save the PCs, but the Chief notices. So Ben, the Swashbucker says he wants to fake out the chief as a distraction, but forgot he put everything into Charm. The GM didn't forget, and forced Ben to think of a way to seduce the attention of the Naga Chief.

So, Ben kinda squirm danced while flicking his tongue. As did the Swashnucker. Ben rolled a Nat 20. The GM facepalmed, and proceeded to describe how the Naga Chief had not ever felt such a massive drive to possess something, how incomplete he'd realized his life was without, Ben's character. And fully sexually intoxicated, proceeded to chase after Ben.

Ben Fled.

The rescued PCs saw an opportunity to save their fleeing Swashbucker before the worst case scenario befell him. So, the new PC barbarian decided to hurl a great spear at the Naga Chief, rolling so well it impaled the brute. Then the new Druid used his nature magic to make vines wrap around the impaling spear and drag the Naga Chief into the enormous bonfire that was raging out of control, and the Barbarian said, "I'll grab onto the vines and help." The Barbarian rolled so well, that the Naga Chief was successfully pulled into the raging inferno where he roasted and died without dealing a single point of damage to any of the characters, let alone making an attack roll.

The GM was pretty emotionally drained after the session.

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Rentok




8th Feb 2021, 4:10 AM

I've got one about an entire campaign. The setting was the plane of Ixalan based off MtG, and we were playing pirates. The GM had a bunch of stuff planned, and some very cool and interesting encounters- but something was different about this group of PCs. Now, our group has a tendency towards high powered campaigns, and we play a hybridized system of D&D 3.5e and Pathfinder 1.0, so there's a lot of room for crazy stuff- though the goal is always to have fun and interesting characters more than just raw power.

So there's some context for when I say that our group was comprised of;
-A T-Rex (someone who was *constantly* transformed) that could grapple and devour nearly anything, and his goblin cohort who provided free flanking to the whole party
-A treefolk who increased our flanking bonuses and added them to our damage and his three construct minions (a healer, a melee dude, and a sniper)
-An air elemental (someone who was also *constantly* transformed) who altered the weather to provide party-wide concealment, further bonuses on our attacks and damage, and consistent ranged damage
-Plus my character, the "captain" who had five or six (weak and innacurate) attacks per round, insane bonuses to sailing checks and to the crew of any ship she captained, with enough AC to be near untouchable, and a leadership score sufficient to crew our ship (and an entire armada by the end of the campaign. Plus her cohort who was a solid melee combatant and could grant an extra turn to an ally about once per combat.

We hadn't co-ordinated this party, hadn't even really discussed what our characters did with each other (though we all talked with the DM about our own characters.) It was by chance rather than design, but this party had such incredible synergy that we were unstoppable. All the bonuses we were providing each other just happened to be of different types, so they all stacked. All the AoE buffs we were keeping up constantly were even stronger because we had multiple minions. And with all those bonuses to attack and damage rolls, our sheer math advantage was incredible. We were taking on enemies designed for level 12 parties when we were still level 7, and winning easily.

Our DM is fantastic, and took things in stride. Honestly it was such a fun campaign for everyone involved, and it could have been such a disaster with anyone else at the helm. It's very rare for a DM to react so positively upon seeing the results of that first combat, where an encounter designed to be a challenging introduction to the dangers of the world got so easily stomped.

The moral of the story is... it doesn't matter what game you play or how you play it, what's important is that everyone is having a good time.

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Tempestfury




8th Feb 2021, 4:56 AM

How did the Treefolk add Flanking Bonuses to damage? I'm a 3.P veteran, but I don't recall see such an ability ever.

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Rentok




10th Feb 2021, 1:56 AM

Spheres of Power. If you ever want to be overpowered like a highly optimized character, but don't want to have to spend the time doing the heavy optimization, spheres of power will do it for you.

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Zorro362




8th Feb 2021, 6:13 AM

We had a battle once, our DM though we would breeze through it, as it was just the first fight on the dungeon. And in retrospect I can see why, we had decent tank, good dps, for both close and long range and decent healing. The reality?

Not so much, we barely survived. Why you might ask?
4 words.
MIND. FLAYER. STUN. LOCK.

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Sorakage




8th Feb 2021, 6:36 AM
"John"

A while ago, I watched a shockingly one sided battle that the DM admitted was supposed to go the other way around. It was a pirate campaign, and the party consisted of a half elf rogue, a merman monk, and a centaur bard.

They went to a carnival for info on the corruption plaguing the island. The merman monk got talked into participating in the fighting arena against the champion: a 9 foot tall Tiefling barbarian who looked like a Hulked out version of the girl from the ring and acted like she was high on pixie sticks (they later learned she was the daughter of a Balor demon, yes you read that right DAUGHTER...not descendent). And she was tricked out to the point where she could crush rocks with her bare hands.

What was supposed to happen, was the monk was supposed to get his ass kicked since she could knock him out in one hit, even with a low roll. Then she would sneak out of the carnival and follow them because she thought they were funny, slowly growing to respect the group as their adventures went on.

What actually happened was the monk got stupidly lucky and played very defensively, whittling her down until he could land the final blow. The barbarian was so impressed that she asked to become his student.

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Darkening




8th Feb 2021, 12:51 PM

Good old natural one-ders lol. That was a hell of a session. The party making ridiculous amounts of money betting on it and winning that longshot bet is great too.

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Guest




8th Feb 2021, 12:56 PM

I see you referencing TFS at the Table. Let's not forget the time the party was supposed to have a boss fight against some kind of flaming pirate vampire Paladin and the boss instead immediately rolled several natural 1s, resulting in him slipping on ball bearings, falling through the ship and drowning.

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Sorakage




8th Feb 2021, 1:27 PM
"John"

Oh yeah! The Johnny Darksouls/ball bearing incident was easily one of the funniest things to happen before the timeskip.

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Paranoidpequin




8th Feb 2021, 6:39 AM

About what you expect.

Party is geared up to fight a ancient Red dragon logically it should be a tough fight.

The party deploys multiple giant crabs, the dragon fails his saves and gets grappled and then swarmed by fire resistant super crabs and the party.

Dragon gets up flame breath everyone. Rolls minimum damage and everyone made the saves. Spoiler it never got it’s breath weapon back.

Long story short what was supposed to be an epic boss battle was quickly reduced to rag doll the boss o’clock

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Rudedog

Rudedog




8th Feb 2021, 11:03 AM

I have a similar type of story: the scripted loss that the dice gods spoil.

It was a homebrew campaign world. The players were a pirate fighter who eventually dual classes into wizard, a paladin trying to reform him, and a rotating cast of characters that the third player decided he didn't like enough to keep.

The players had rampaged across the world, they had scammed the nobles, heard the pitiable wails of the common people, and they had decided to become this land's champions. They marched themselves to the gates of the aristocratic lords castle, a powerful wizard by reputation, and kicked down the door, destroying his minions without much effort. They scaled his personal tower and burst into his private sanctum where the master awaited.

But they underestimated their prey. He was a Level 20 wizard with reality warping powers and a virtually invincible save vs magic. He simply laughed at them and told them them that for the crime of damaging his property (both living and non) they would spend the remainder of their lives toiling in his salt mines. Then they rolled for initiative.

The Fighter/Wizard won and decided to open the combat with his best spell, polymorph other. The wizard laughed as the upstart pirate completed the incantation, as he had shrugged off many like it easily, but this time, he blinked. I rolled his save openly to demoralize them and it came up 1, exactly the only result that would be a failure. So the BBEG was turned into an ordinary toad during his cameo appearance and despite attempting to hide under the furniture, the relentless PCs found and stomped him to death. They would have taken over his position, but they got distracted by his spelljamming ship and ended up exploring strange new worlds and civilizations instead, boldly going where no one had gone before! *Cue music*

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Halosty45

Halosty45




8th Feb 2021, 1:15 PM

There was somewhat of an opposite take on this in one game I was in. Of course, the absurdity of what happened is because it was epic level 3.5, where CRs are even more of a vague suggestion than at lower levels. Optimized characters can have any number of abilities that completely negate entire categories of monsters, but they might have simple holes in their defenses that are easy to overcome.

In a battle with an Elder Titan, our spellcaster failed his will save against the epic spell Mass Frog (Chances are, it was a natural 1 to fail- but I can't guarantee it). Being a frog, of course, he couldn't speak or form somatic components. That would put most spellcasters pretty out of the fight. However, he merely hopped forward five feet, using his ability as an archmage to use a touch spell at thirty feet away. Then he cast Irresistible Dance. That spell still has verbal components, but... this guy had the ability to still and silence *all* of his spells without requiring an increase in spell slot or casting time. So being a frog didn't really hinder much but his movement speed.

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Pablo360




8th Feb 2021, 4:54 PM

OK, hold on, but you messed up. If a polymorphed creature is reduced to 0 hp in its transformed state, it returns to normal. That should not have killed the big bad.

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Darkening




9th Feb 2021, 9:46 PM

In 3.5 at least that's not the case. I know it works that way with druids in 5e, so maybe it's the same with polymorph, but who knows what version they were playing.

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Pablo360




8th Feb 2021, 4:52 PM

The big bad of the first arc of my first campaign ended up being a pushover. It was 5e But Pokémon, and the gimmick of the fight was that he had a Mega-Evolved Pokémon — something that wasn't even heard of, and whose existence was part of a long series of clues toward an ancient conspiracy that's responsible for basically every problem in the campaign, directly or indirectly.

Advice for anyone who wants to do something similar: If one of your party members has an ability that forces a monster to sleep on a failed Charisma save, make sure the centerpiece of your boss battle has a decent Charisma score.

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HaruNoHikaru




8th Feb 2021, 6:18 PM

Just a couple weeks ago my game group got a story for this. It was supposed to be a pretty even match, because we-the-party and they-the-villain were on spaceships that were p comparable in terms of damage and stealth and speed, except they were just a smidge faster than us and both were hidden from the other. But, our party managed to find them first, partially because two beginner force users practiced sensing for it. The gunner then managed to hit them for a LOT of damage at once, causing the bad guys to try and run away. We managed a few good shots on them after that, but because of their greater speed they were going to get away until I hacked them at a critical second and slowed them down for a round. that round gave us one last shot, which ended up doing massive damage and blowing up the ship. There were several escape pods that tried to fly away, and our force users were able to track the one that had the guy we were trying to kill before he got away. This guy had a very competent team of hackers and gunners, and a just slightly faster ship, and we got lucky and beat him extremely quickly. unfortunately, that was the stealthy info broker, and next on the list is the powerful enforcer whom everyone's afraid of, which means the gm might go extra hard on us next time . . .

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Guest




1st Mar 2021, 5:03 AM

There was a small army of Kobolds attacking a town, and should have been a decent challenge for us at the time, except the DM couldn't stop botching his rolls, so they kept missing us and whacking each other all fight.

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