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Average Rating: 5
Number of people who have voted: 4


By the same author as Grand Line 3.5
Comments:

Phantomdemon




11th Feb 2019, 7:31 AM

Given that Ussop was the joke character made into a PC, you should probably cast a healing word or something to heal him up.

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Otaku

Otaku




11th Feb 2019, 3:01 PM

Was it a joke character? I went back and read up and it isn't really clear after a dozen or so comics. A lot of stuff goes wrong off the bat, but Phil does roll low at those times. Or misreads the GM's handwriting. XP

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Kale

Kale




11th Feb 2019, 9:57 PM

Well, I think he's less of a joke character and more he just has a niche and Phill's not familiar with the ins and outs yet.

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Phantomdemon




12th Feb 2019, 9:38 AM

Well, I say joke character, in that, his stats seem ok, but in looks like he's more of an everyman character, and one who was supposed to be an NPC.

When Phil joined, he got that character, who would be fine normally, but he's in a crew of munchkins.

You can see his stats on page 247, but it's his skills that are the issue. According to one of the pages, he's got a +12 in Crafting Ships, which indicates a focus on that, but he's a marksman/Alchemist build.

In other words, Ussop was an NPC who got promoted to PC and his build doesn't quite match the Munchkin levels of the others.

Which does give a good in character and out of character reason to look more into the alchemy side of things though.

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m2012e




11th Feb 2019, 8:25 AM
"Ahh, the weak link of the party"

Some players get lucky when they're rolling their stats.
Some players have a specific build in mind that they aim for as they level up.
Some players know how to game the rules to make the strongest character possible.
Some players know which classes have abilities that are just a tad overpowered.

Other players... don't.

Tell us about an uneven power distribution between party members.

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m2012e




11th Feb 2019, 8:31 AM

The barbarian in our party (5e) took the totem warrior path and chose path of the bear. This means that since level 3, he's been taking half damage from everything besides psychic (and that doesn't come up too much).

Also, the DM hands out inappropriately high-powered magic items like candy, so he has a greatsword that deals an extra 2d6 cold damage. He swings for 4d6+7 damage per turn. Once he hit level 5, he got a second attack.

As such, the DM's combats are usually just a single creature who will knock out any other party member in one to two shots (sometimes multiple characters at once). So the barbarian plays both tank and damage output while everyone else plays support. Every time.

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HenshinFanatic




11th Feb 2019, 11:55 AM

The resistance to everything except Psychic only occurs during Rage which is hard-capped to a small number of uses per day until around 12th level, and even then you have to keep getting hit and/or dishing out hits to keep it going, so in certain situations a poorly timed Rage can force you to use multiple in the same encounter, especially if the fight drags on. It's only at level 20 do they get unlimited rage per day without having to worry about maintaining it (something they get 5 levels earlier).

Sounds more like the DM doesn't know how to build encounters and everyone is operating on a 15-minute adventuring day.

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Halosty45

Halosty45




11th Feb 2019, 2:39 PM

One of my most successful campaigns somewhat accidentally solved that problem.
It was basically groundhog day... if only in the sense that at the end of the day when the inevitably died they started over.
In total they had about 12 hours, which meant one or two short rests and one long rest for the entire dungeon- and I didn't make those rests easy.
What's that? You spend an hour one room over from that pile of bodies? Somebody notices they are missing when nobody shows up for the next shift and they call for the gorgon to go hunt down whatever the problem is... etc. etc.
Anyway, the whole thing turned into properly managing resources like which encounters the barbarian needed to rage in... and after they leveled up they re-did many of them and got further with fewer resources burned.
The best part of the campaign was it allowed me to not feel bad about realistic aggro mechanics. What's that, you shout back to the party that you see some enemies? Not only the enemies you're talking about, but the ones in the rooms all around come out and kill you. Except that one time when they'd leveled up enough to aggro the entire first 6 rooms of the dungeon together and win.

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m2012e




12th Feb 2019, 4:53 PM

We're aware of the "only during a rage bit," but it was a couple months before I found out he had to keep taking/dealing damage to stay in a rage.

And yes, our days are short. It's rare that we have two encounters in one day. I don't think we have taken a short rest the entire campaign, only "Alright, you guys can have all your hit points back."

And when I say "one opponent encounters," I also mean that he usually throws something that by all rights ought to kill everyone. Half the time, we're supposed to talk our way our, the other half he pulls some deus ex machina.

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HappyEevee




11th Feb 2019, 2:37 PM

My brother and I played in a short-lived 5e campaign (job schedules shifted and we had to stop meeting) but we played long enough to become legend with our 2-man combo. The other players were a dwarf fighter, a dragonborn sorcerer, a tabaxi swashbuckler, and a pacifist firbolg cleric.

We played as two humans... boring, perhaps, but we wanted the feats. My brother played a moon-circle druid, so his thing was Wild Shape. I played a rogue and took the Mounted Combat feat. The GM agreed (possibly without thinking things through, given that he knew we were munchkins) that since I'd taken the feat, I could ride the druid whenever he was Wild Shaped into something of size large or bigger.

Now, here's where the fun started: in 5e, a rogue gets flanking any time another party member is within 5 feet of them. When mounted on the druid, I had constant flanking and therefore always got my Sneak Attack dice. Also, the Mounted Combat feat gave me advantage against enemies smaller than my mount, let me grant Evasion to my mount, and let me take one attack per round which would have hit my mount and force it to target me (and my higher AC) instead. My brother then took the Sentinel feat, which meant that if an enemy attacked a party member within 5 feet of him, he got a reaction AoO on that enemy and if he hit, the enemy was stopped from moving.

The two of us slaughtered our way through several encounters with great damage (bear form with full attack plus the rogue's Sneak Attack quickly became one of our favorites), easily beating out the others when it came to destroying enemies.

It helped that Wild Shape druids are really powerful in 5e (the HP pool alone makes them nearly unstoppable at low levels) and the only time the GM really got us was the basilisk that turned the druid to stone (but he got better). Never underestimate the power of sibling teamwork.

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Guest




11th Feb 2019, 10:56 PM

Recent pathfinder campaign I was in had a new player who who was unfortunately never able to grasp how to play their character. They were a dex melee magus who never learned much beyond the basics of spell combat. So while they eventually figured out how to use Arcane Mark to get an extra attack, they were doing chip damage relative to the rest of the party. And since I was playing a Ninja maximized for murderdeathkill, our cavalier was a solidly build mounted combatant, and our life oracle had discovered the joys of Harm spells, their averaging of 16 points of damage a round was very underwhelming. I hope that if they ever play again, they have a better idea of what they’re doing

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Otaku

Otaku




12th Feb 2019, 7:28 PM

We'll call the character "Mr. Lucky". He was rolled up for a GURPS 3e session, notable because you normally spend "Character Points" to build a character and the random option was actually dropped for Fourth Edition. His player rolled quite well, so Mr. Lucky was two or three times as good as everyone else's beginning characters "on paper"...

...but between his player being a novice, our group's "leader" making dubious plan of attack, our GM underestimating how challenging the battle would be (admitted in hindsight), not only did we nearly experience a TPK that left every character but mine recovering from injuries for the next month or two, but Mr. Lucky had taken a head injury, dropping his Intelligence to levels which we weren't comfortable role-playing, so he was retired after one session!

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Guest




11th Feb 2019, 9:23 PM

By the way there was a faulty link on your links page that took you to a porn site, im not sure if its fixed but you might want to check.

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