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Average Rating: 5
Number of people who have voted: 3


By the same author as Grand Line 3.5
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Phantomdemon




26th Nov 2018, 2:17 AM
"What do you mean I can't kill her?"

Story time!

Tell a time you or your party got into an encounter you either couldn't kill, or worse, couldn't even harm.

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Inbetweenaction




27th Nov 2018, 4:50 AM

Hell wasps in pathfinder.

can only be struck by aoe or magic, since they are immune to weapons from their swarm trait. ALL weapons. Including magical.

and they are fire resistant, so most common aoe suck against them.

we encountered them near the end of a dungeon. we had to put up a wall of fire, and jump trough it multiple times so that the fire resistant bastards would take atleast some damage, and then finish them of with the final aoe we had left.

even when we encounter them on higher levels now, we just use a web and capture them, and slowly move out of the way. they are more trouble than they are worth, and what they are guarding can't be that valuble anyways...

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Greencap




2nd Dec 2018, 10:53 PM

sked if there were any children in the slaves. i said yes, thinking that this was deciding whether he deservde to live.... and then she went downstairs, lured them up to the room with candy and sacrificed the KID.

there was an argument, she said the bandit was a great guy and that he'd done more for them than the children, we all pointed out no. no he hadn't, and that was just wrong.

but i STILL couldn't have them go into the late-game land so i said the sacrific failed because it wasn't the right time.... and they said i should have mentioned that when they examined the notes, and i agred to wipe this away and start back.

so we're back to examining the notes..... and suddenly the player from before goes dowstairs to ask about children.

the argument got even worse when we pointed out she was using out-of-character knowledge to do unnecessary child sacrifice and insisting it was the LESS evil thing to do

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Greencap




2nd Dec 2018, 10:54 PM

it cut off a lot of my story. i don't know why. but you get the gist

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*Sigh*




26th Nov 2018, 2:29 AM

I've been trying to think of what Alvida's ability would translate to in D&D or Pathfinder while still following the rules of the game. I'd imagine it basically gives her a rather hefty Deflection, maybe Dodge, and maybe even Cha (the beautification) bonuses to AC, some degree of Fortification (25%-75%), and maybe even just a flat out miss chance for physical attacks to boot?

We see rather soon that her ability is rendered completely ineffective against Smoker's... Smoke, which I'm imagining from an in-game perspective can be explained away as his ability requiring a Reflex save, which means it doesn't get affected by her defense boosts.

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Halosty45

Halosty45




26th Nov 2018, 2:11 PM

Could be quite similar to a Nymph's unearthly grace

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Otaku

Otaku




26th Nov 2018, 4:21 PM

Not sure about having Charisma bonuses directly involved in the other mechanics. Probably best to focus on the end results and work backward, as a lot of the Fruit's lore is really "fluff" and not "crunch". I mean, a character's CHA gets raised because "Sube Sube" is slang for "young and sexy" in Japanese. XD

So... crazy bonuses to things where being slippery is a net positive, like escaping restraints, squeezing through gaps, and breaking free of a grapple in melee. Plus a significant AC bonus because it is supposed to make a character harder to hit. Finally, a CHA bonus because of the pun aspect.

Using a system with which I'm more familiar, GURPS Fourth Edition, things aren't too messy. The main thing to remember is that consuming the fruit sometimes provides a flat bonus, sometimes just overwrites existing Traits with new ones, regardless of the Character Point difference. So, assuming human consumption:

If the character's Appearance level is less than Handsome or Beautiful, set it to that level. If already equal to or greater, raise it by one. If already maxed out, treat as a positive Perk that grants a +1 under circumstances where supernaturally smooth skin would improve the efficacy of one's appearance.

Any Physical Trait directly incompatible with the "smooth skin" or "young and sexy" aspects of the power is lost or masked. Alvida lost her freckles and is no longer a large, fat woman. I cannot recall, but is she shorter than she once was? Does she retain her old mass the way she retains her old strength?

If the detrimental effects of Aging are completely neutralized by the power, so that you cannot die of old age, then Unaging is required. If you still have a fixed lifespan but it is now superhuman, Extended Lifespan is required. If you won't have your appearance suffer due to aging, Longevity is required.

Being incredibly difficult to hit, even when not trying to evade an attack is tricky in GURPS. This would involve either several levels of Enhanced Dodge, possibly applying Modifiers so that it at least looks like she isn't trying to Dodge when she actually is or Damage Resistance (DR) with sufficient Modifiers to replicate the same effect. Note that in GURPS, DR subtracts from the damage an attack does; pretty sure it means something else entirely if it shows up in Pathfinder.

The part about being slippery to the touch, difficult to grab, to bind with restraints, and to slip through openings is handled by Slippery. The only hang up here is I'm not sure we've seen Alvida try to squeeze herself through a narrow passage before.

Sube Sube Spur would just be handled as Enhanced Move (Ground), with Preparation Required and a less-strict version of the "Road" Limitation. "Requires DX Roll" may also be appropriate.

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Rastaba

Rastaba




26th Nov 2018, 2:49 AM

...I ponder if Luke is thinking “...this got weird, I’m gonna go over there now,” “Is this some kind of puzzle I’m supposed to figure out so I can beat her?” Or “...so can I hit her or not?” As I could see Luke considering any of the three and probably several others.

Go ahead and reply with your ideas for what Luke is thinking in panel 9!

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DeadpanSal




26th Nov 2018, 2:56 AM

"I've got the weirdest boner."

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Poker




26th Nov 2018, 10:58 AM

"Where the heck did Gordon learn to pull out the 'sexy woman' voice this well."

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Otaku

Otaku




26th Nov 2018, 4:26 PM

I actually expected this to be the inspiration for "story time". Doesn't every group go through this, that moment when you realize you have to decide:

Do you avoid or just go with role-playing that involves some sexual elements... whoa! I'm talking about verbal flirting, or maybe looking at someone in a "sexy" manner. It also isn't just about the players directly involved; most of the time you have an "audience" of at least the rest of the group when you're gaming. ^^'

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Raxon

Raxon




26th Nov 2018, 3:26 AM

Man, just recently, we got the party split. Each person had to go through a door. There was a test of courage, a test of strength, a test of wit, a test of piety, and a test of magic. I, being the wizard, had to enter the test of magic. The creator of the dungeon was a huge dick, because the test of magic is facing a night indestructible clay golem.

If you're not familiar with clay golems, they're large, powerful, and most importantly, highly resistant to magic. In fact, they're resistant to damn near everything that itsn't an adamantine hammer. I did not make it out alive. After talking with everyone else, it seems I'm not the only one whose room was physically impossible to beat.

The paladin had an even meaner no win scenario that involved a suffering child with a demon lord's curse. The only way to remove it involves a ritual which includes renouncing your own soul and pledging it to hell. To ignore the child is to lose paladinhood. The door back is locked until the child's status changes. To pledge your soul to hell is to renounce your god, and so you lose your paladinhood.

Apparently, the owner of the dungeon just haaaaaates spellcasters.

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Tempestfury




26th Nov 2018, 4:26 AM

... Sounds to me that your DM is a dick. Seriously? Making a Paladin fall, for refusing to sell your soul to hell? The fuck?

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Guest




26th Nov 2018, 11:02 AM

Yeah. or at least, he should have put in some hint that they where not suposed to go through the door that logically seemed to belong to them.

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Raxon

Raxon




26th Nov 2018, 2:03 PM

Funny thing is, we sorta screwed ourselves. See, we knew the big bad was a dick this way. We also knew where his lair was, by methods of deduction. We said screw the rest of the campaign, we're gonna take him down now!

Final dungeon was geared for a level 17-20 party. We were level four when we figured out the dungeon's location. The test of strength involved lifting a stone column to a hole in the ceiling to use like a key. The test of courage had more or less coming face to face with images of yourself, and finding your true self. False yous would attack you. Finally, the test of wit involved a series of puzzles and riddles as water rose. It seems all the puzzles were to distract from the straightforward answer, and the real puzzle was determining, based on the clues given by the puzzles and riddles, what the actual solution was. He rolled for perception with each puzzle and riddle. Highest was 12, not nearly enough.

If I was the level I was supposed to be, a clay golem would have been a challenge, but not impossible. The paladin would have had a sword that cuts evil, but doesn't harm the innocent.

In the span of one session, we ruined what was intended to be a campaign because we were pissed about the big bad wrecking our city.

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Halosty45

Halosty45




26th Nov 2018, 2:14 PM

See this is why context is important. TPKs are a totally reasonable when you go as level 4's against a city-wrecking villain.

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Poker




27th Nov 2018, 1:15 PM

Oh, i see. that explain everything.
Sequence breaking is a tricky thing to try. Better reserve it for when we're sure that we can go through with it.

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Raxon

Raxon




27th Nov 2018, 5:41 PM

We didn't know we were sequence breaking. We were following clues the DM didn't realize he was dropping.

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Paranoidpequin




26th Nov 2018, 6:38 AM

If this was 5e then no he wouldn’t fall from that even if he was devotion.

Hell even if it’s not 5e that’s not something that a paladin should fall over unless your DM is a complete asshole and goes well beyond rules aswritten against paladins.

Honestly it looks like your DM was the kind you flip off and then get someone else to DM a new game.

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Valandar




26th Nov 2018, 9:24 PM

Even in 1st ed, it's explicitly said that if the Paladin is forced to choose between Law and Good, they MUST choose Good - and such a choice would not cause them to fall, nor require atonement.

There's a third solution in that Paladin's test, though, BTW... Pray for forgiveness, and give the child the Blade's Mercy. Then, an oath is sworn to rescue the child's soul from Hell when your Chapter Lord (or whatever) deems you ready (aka, when you're high enough level).

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Raxon

Raxon




27th Nov 2018, 5:35 AM

I actually prefer my after the fact solution. Stab the kid, toss him in your back, and get your order to rez him. Said paladin was from a very prestigious order, with very good connections within.

He was a networking paladin, in line to be the head of the order.

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Halosty45

Halosty45




27th Nov 2018, 2:32 PM

I dunno if killing him would fix the curse though... curses usually persist through trivial things like death. Though remove curse is lower level than those spells (but doesn't actually remove all curses because that would be too easy)

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Nodrog




26th Nov 2018, 7:19 AM

Did you check to see if you could go through a door other then the one marked for you?

"My Barbarian half-giant goes to the door marked Test of Wit and smashes it open."

"Um, the next room has a plaque on the wall. It reads 'My first is the last half of what you beat, whether to sound advance or retreat. My next is a language you read with your fingers, and my last is a musical note that lingers'."

"Thork the Thick can't read! He smashes the plaque!"

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Crisis




26th Nov 2018, 11:08 AM

But what does an umbrella have to do with anything?

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kgy121




27th Nov 2018, 5:21 PM

It's the only thing in the room enchanted with enough acid resist to go through the secret acidfall passageway.

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Guest




26th Nov 2018, 8:40 AM

In such a circumstance, the appropriate response is to start beating the DM with the corebook until they're too traumatized to run a game again.

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Guest




26th Nov 2018, 10:27 AM

The funny thing about that Paladin one is that it could be solved by asking why a DEMON lord would want you to pledge your soul to hell. Then call in the actual forces of hell to perform an audit of this operation. Most devils point blank refuse to do “lol you fall” plans because such crude methods cause them to be looked down on by their peers. And if the DM says you still fall for “ignoring” the child, point out how you plan to get the infernal bureaucracy to lift their curse as payment for reporting a demon lord masquerading as one of them

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Crisis




26th Nov 2018, 11:13 AM

Honestly I question the legitimacy of any dungeon puzzle containing a live child.

I also question whether or not this DM knows what 'piety' means (given I'm reasonably certain this was the 'test of piety').

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Raxon

Raxon




26th Nov 2018, 2:21 PM

No. The big bad built the dungeon. If we had gone through the campaign instead of jumping straight to the end, we'd have had all we needed,both in levels and gear. The DM laid it all out for us after we died.

We thought the DM was dropping hints so we could go kill the bad guy. Turns out he was just trying to be cryptic, and we screwed ourselves. This all happened in the span of one session, about eight sessions in.

I don't blame him. I mean, if I was level 17 like I was supposed to be, I could have taken that golem, and the paladin was supposed to be given a sword that only cuts evil and harmlessly passed through good by his god as part of the campaig. It's a good group, and the DM is usually pretty good at this stuff.

Each of the tests was a mockery of the trait it was testing. It's just that it was supposed to be turned around using the sword given for piety and self sacrifice.

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Guest




26th Nov 2018, 7:54 PM

I am picturing that the test of wit was realizing the puzzles were a distraction and had nothing to do with the true solution to open the door, (IE: It was actually unlocked the whole time, or, it's a PULL door, not a push door, or you just gotta jiggle it the right way because the frame it warped sort of nonsense lol) so you would spend all your time on the puzzles and drown if you didn't see the straightforward answer.

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Raxon

Raxon




27th Nov 2018, 5:30 AM

That was literally the only one that wasn't totally dependant on being a high level, as the rogue's player actually stood a chance of figuring it out and all any of us realy knew about the big bad at this point was that he was a dick who burned down a city full of people just to flush out one man and kill him. Otherwise, we knew he'd had dealings with orcs to the north.

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Crisis




27th Nov 2018, 11:40 AM

Having read your above context, I do agree that it changes pretty much everything about your story. DM was being less of a dick than sticking to what he'd planned when his players decided to try and end things prematurely.

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Raxon

Raxon




27th Nov 2018, 5:44 PM

We though the DM was nervous about something else. We thought he was dicking with us when the rooms screwed us, too.

I think he's learned to sanitize rumors. We found the lair because of the rumor and the geological location.

See, all around this island nation, there was a perfect ring of walls on top of sheer cliffs. One of the rumors we picked up was that he makes his home at the furthest point from the walls. The furthest point from the rim of a ring is the center. We bought a map, and with that clue, we quickly deduced to location of his lair.

It was supposed to be cryptic and mysterious, and we took that clue and screwed ourselves on it.

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