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Average Rating: 5
Number of people who have voted: 3


By the same author as Grand Line 3.5
Comments:

*Sigh*




26th Sep 2018, 1:05 AM

While this isn't what ends up happening in the comic, this does bring to mind something that's happened to me recently that I want to get your takes on: forced PC death by GM plot contrivance.

Maybe the GM thinks it's a good plot twist, maybe you've collaborated with them to make it happen, maybe the GM thinks your character is too strong or breaks with the party dynamic too much, but regardless of the reason the end result is that a seemingly impossible to escape situation has arisen that WILL result in the death of a PC. Has this ever happened to you, and if so what did you think about it?

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Guest




26th Sep 2018, 2:38 AM

Why the fuck is my party a bunch of team killing fuckwits?

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Rastaba

Rastaba




27th Sep 2018, 1:31 AM

Depends...is your name Leonard Church?

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Guest




28th Sep 2018, 6:47 AM

Nope. Which is bad. They were about as smart, but way more skilled. And it ended in a gunfight in a hospital. Between the party.

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DeadpanSal




26th Sep 2018, 3:58 AM

I orchestrated the isolation and murder of a single player's character at the table because they were too awesome and the villain wanted the entire world to mourn their end. After giving me the biggest middle finger in character and killing himself before I could kill him, he then proceeded to tear apart the afterlife until he came back and punched the guy who killed him right when he looked like he was going to win the final battle.

The takeaway? If you murder a player character, make absolutely sure it's only the start of something better for them. (see also Order of the Stick)

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Guest




26th Sep 2018, 11:30 PM

So it was the climax of the campaign. The party is holding the line to protect a spaceport evacuating civilians from a planet that had suddenly turned into a four way between Ctan aligned Necrons, Khornite Tau, Eldar backed by an Avatar of Khaine, and a giant warp spawned monstrosity and its heralds. Luckily for the party, the kaiju class opponents were busy dealing with eachother, and (unknown to most of the party) the heralds were actually there to help the party (long story involving a deal with a daemon who believes in quality customer service).

Now our priest went into this battle fully expecting to die. He had used up all his “get out of death free” tokens quite a while back fending off Demonic Team Rocket, so he spent a good chunk of the campaign convinced he’s living on borrowed time. So when the Wraithlord came in and fired the Eldar equivalent of a napalm rocket at his face, he accepted his fate.

It was cute how he thought I’d let him off that easily.

The Big E wasn’t done with him yet, so he sent the priest back. Back with a mission, find the person who contracted with the warp abomination and break that contract before it fully manifested in the Materium.

Rising from the ashes of a man who thought himself irredeemable, a new Living Saint was born... and very quickly failed his mission to find the contractor, got caught in a localized temporal retcon created by the monstrosity, and went back to being a depressed albino who feels guilty every time he gets an erection, only now he has a fragment of the Emperor floating around in his soul. It doesn’t have any power or anything, it just manifests as a voice in his head that insults him for being a fuckup.

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DeS_Tructive

DeS_Tructive




26th Sep 2018, 8:56 AM

After making one bad choice after the other, the group of my superhero/cover-ops campaign kept screwing up the point where literally every other organisation was screaming for their heads, completely derailing the campaign from the original plot (which would have been an alien invasion).

So, I did what every good GM would: I had the base of their only remaining ally organisation attacked, and while they were out to save them, the alliance of former allies took over the group's base.

My plan was for them to finally realize how much they had screwed up, and spend the next part of the campaign regaining the trust of their former allies until they earn the base back, just in time for the alien invasion.

Despite everything I told them, they still decided to go "full superhero" and reconquer their base, despite it being under the downtown area of a major german city. And being warned that it was booby trapped up to the neck. And taking on a superior number of far more experienced agents. And me telling them, both in game and as a GM, that this was a really, really bad idea.

So they went through a no-win scenario where each threat was designed to only be stopped by a specific power set, ie.: one PC had to sacrifice themself or decide which other PC to let die.

If they failed both, they could still salvage the scene by having two major NPCs sacrifice themself to save them or blow up a section of their base, killing a few thousand civilians and causing millions of collateral damage in the process.

After two dead PCs, ten dead staff members and fifteen thousand dead and injured civilians, downtown Frankfurt (and their former base) a smoking crater, the players finally realized that perhaps they should have listened to the NPCs advice (and the GMs constant warnings about this NOT being a hack and slash RPG).

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Otaku

Otaku




26th Sep 2018, 9:17 AM

The only times it happened in my old High School/Early College group were:

1) The GM had grown tired of the game and while he didn't resort to character killing, he allowed us to be tricked - barely based on rolls - into allowing ourselves to bond with a parasitic alien race of... intelligent lettuce heads. Or maybe they were cabbage. Which maybe should have been a clue but with his sense of humor, going from grimdark to absurd and back had already happened more than once. XP

2) It was a campaign where a lot of us were running multiple characters for "reasons". One of mine proved to be poorly designed, or maybe he just suffered a series of bad rolls, but either way, he died and the party didn't go back to even collect the body. An NPC tag-along with great power had fallen for him, so she managed to get him raised...

...as an agent for the God of Death. Wait, isn't this supposed to be about PC's set up to die? My former character had become an NPC, but I was okay with it. The GM informed me that, for game balance reasons, we'd be experiencing a TPK but our characters would be resurrected that same session. My old PC would now be an NPC, the one who would tackle the entire party and asked if I wanted to step in and voice him once the big reveal was made (and I did).

...

One player was so ticked off at the no-win scenario, he crumpled up his Character Sheet and was about to destroy it when the GM demanded it. He was still so ticked off that it took a bit for him to cool down and understand that it was plot related temporary death, not perma-death. It wasn't even like we were being super nerfed or anything; just a few minor corrections (we were still stupidly overpowered at that point XP).

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Rudedog

Rudedog




26th Sep 2018, 5:07 PM

Plot based deaths without player buy-in before hand are the DM equivalent of a table flip or a hail mary pass. You only pull that card when you are done with the campaign and probably the playgroup or you know to your marrow that the group is down with literally anything.

Don't try this at home, kids!

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werefrog




26th Sep 2018, 8:45 PM
"GM plot character death"

The Werefrog played a game for 4 successive weeks of Vampire: The Masquerade. The Werefrog know it was 4 weeks, because there were 4 characters played by The Werefrog.

Each game session, the GM would set up the traps/challenges/etc. to be designed against the character introduced the previous week due to the prior character getting killed.

After the 4th death, The Werefrog said the character survives. The GM argued, but The Werefrog said, "You made the challenge. You are not using some preconstructed adventure. Each week, the challenges have been designed to kill one character. This character doesn't die, or next week, there won't be a game."

That game ended. The other players were on the side of the GM at first, but when they realized, the pattern was, kill one player's character, introduce new character, and then next week, kill that one too, they started to realize it was the GM out to take out the character of The Werefrog.

They said we could just make a new character, and play again next week, but The Werefrog said no to that. Either the character survives, or The Werefrog, who hosted the game, would not host and would not play.

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Guest




27th Sep 2018, 4:52 AM
"Forced conversion to team evil is even worse."

In our groups previous campaign our previous DM randomly decided to introduce planes walkers into a high seas campaign pretty much for kicks. Bad idea for a few reasons:

1. While it doesn't contradict Magic The Gathering lore, D&D wasn't designed to handle MTGs broken (in universe and out) mechanics. The entire point of MTG is that nothing native can handle a planes walkers magical Everything Powers(tm) which explicitly make them overpowered outside context problems.

2. All the enemies in MTG are more of the same but even worse.

3. He brought out the Eldrazi. Not only are they the most invincible Big Bads, but also the most generic and uninteresting ones.

4. He constantly had people making will saves not to be enslaved to Eldrazi just from casting spells and praying. A Clerics entire job is casting spells and praying. We were crusaders.

5. He even forced conversion of two new players who hadn't even got to play their characters yet without consulting them. "By the way, you know the characters you made? Screw 'em. You're Eldrazi spawn now."

In short, half the group didn't JUST die. They weren't JUST forced onto team evil without a choice. They were forced onto team boring, generic, and UNFUN evil and had to keep playing their ruined characters for the rest of the campaign. And we couldn't really complain about it because he has a temper problem, can't and WON'T take criticism, and co-owns the shop.

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Guest




27th Sep 2018, 9:32 AM

Once dealt with a party member with the worst build imaginable. Mind control psion with many levels in the prestige class DM’s Girlfriend.

“Imma charge and smash the villain in the fact!”

“No you don’t. You don’t want to.”

“Lets go to the bar and get ALL the ale and whores!”

“I don’t like ale and whores, therefore you don’t either”

“Fuck it! I’m gonna put all my points into pyschic resistance so my character can have some free will”

“Your character wouldn’t know how to resist psychic powers, because I blocked them from ever being able to even get the idea”

“Fine! Suicide and next week I’m coming in with an undead construct”

“No”

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Generic Greg




27th Sep 2018, 2:04 PM

Thats...


Extremely irritating.

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Generic Greg




27th Sep 2018, 2:41 PM

I mean I get it.

But that's the type of character id make into the freaking villain out of sheer disrespect for that playstyle. I mean seriously, not only a psion in general, but one that goes out of their way to force others to follow their views? Screw that.

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Generic Greg




27th Sep 2018, 2:47 PM

I'm still not done, even from a story standpoint that character should be evil. From what you've said, it's directly implied that she is almost Constantly inside the heads of the party. From a game perspective it's just utterly irritating to be unable to play the character you wanted in the game because somebodies playing a "Lel I can read ur thoughts and change them, so I won't even let you know you had that though xd I'm such a good rper."

I may or may not have some ptsd relating to this exact thing

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Raxon

Raxon




27th Sep 2018, 11:42 PM

I have a psion character like that, except he's basically psychic James Bond. He inserts himself into other peoples' lives and sets himself up as their most trusted confidante, then uses that to steal secrets.

Still dickish, but with more purpose that 'LOL I'm in ur head now go fuck that beehive lololol'.

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Generic Greg




28th Sep 2018, 12:43 AM

Oh, so kind of like that one dude from Bleach.

Such a messed up power.

So good for storytelling.

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Raxon

Raxon




27th Sep 2018, 11:32 PM

I had a DM like that once. She was a damn dirty hippie.

Our characters were retconned to be pacifists. My ranger's wolf companion could suddenly speak, informed me that he wanted to go by the name Fleur, not Fang, and that he was vegan now.

We didn't resolve conflicts, we were out helping people. And we weren't allowed to get paid for it. Over the course of three sessions, we went from badass warriors to scholars who taught bridge trolls how to farm arable land. One of our characters even destroyed his family's ancestral sword when the DM decided that a particularly trite scene gave him a change of heart, and that fighting and killing is never the answer.

The third session had us set our dice aside in favor of performances. As in, when using diplomancy, we would act it out, and we would each cast a vote on how moving it was.

Yes, really. It wasn't fun.

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Guest




28th Sep 2018, 6:22 PM

The worst part is that the basic premise of that campaign has potential. Sort of a socioeconomic simulator with a heavy dose of Roseau was Right, getting to go around and just be a nice person helping people.

BUT having been around the first time you told this story, I know your DM went about it in exactly the wrong way. If you want to run a lighthearted game with little violence, tell me that before I show up with Warmaster Murderface and my chainax Gorefamily. Also don’t run the game in D&D. If you want a nonviolent game about helping people, look up Golden Sky Stories.

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Poker




26th Sep 2018, 8:49 AM

hapenend once. i got a character captured and raken to a villain's place, so i quickly made another character to play until the party have rescued my previous PC. One the rescue was completed, since i did'nt want to play two pc, is was just going to have the replacement PC leave unceremoniously, but the GM suggested that we gave him a plot relevant farewell instead. So he ended up isolated at the wrong place at the wrong time and caugh a NPC that was until then thought to be a allie scheming with the bad guy about their upcomming attack. He got killed for discovering it, but managed to send the information to the rest of the party. I also concentrated most of my effort during the uneven 3 on 1 fight to one of the bad guy, and managed to wound him enough to allow the others to quickly dispose of it when the time came.

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