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Average Rating: 5
Number of people who have voted: 2


By the same author as Grand Line 3.5
Comments:

Volteri




11th Oct 2017, 2:23 AM

You know you have too many flaws if you can't remember them all.

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DeS_Tructive

DeS_Tructive




11th Oct 2017, 8:11 AM

Naah, that's okay. The DM will be sure to remember them in the worst times possible.

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Joe the Rat




11th Oct 2017, 8:47 AM

Every flaw you take
Every roll you make
Every oath you break
Every step you take
The GM's watching you...

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Rastaba

Rastaba




13th Oct 2017, 1:24 AM

This is what people invent cheat sheets for...if you do it digitally you can probably sort them alphabetically. Or by 'Hazard Factor'.

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DeS_Tructive

DeS_Tructive




11th Oct 2017, 8:57 AM

On a more serious note, though. I loved that some RPGs around 2010 started getting smarter when it comes to flaw systems.
The biggest issue with flaws was that it was up to the DM/Storyteller to keep track of them, since a lot of players tended to forget them at one point or the other. With the DM already keeping track of plots, NPCs and relevant stats/abilities of players, they honestly shouldn't need this.
World of Darkness, for example, dealt with it by giving the player extra XP whenever their flaws gave them problems in game, and allowed the regeneration of willpower when they played up to their vices. Those were also the only benefits of flaws, so taking them during character creation did nothing.
It was interesting to see how the amount of flaws in my group shrunk when we switched from oWoD to nWoD.

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XicoFelipe

XicoFelipe




11th Oct 2017, 9:44 AM

In Mutants and Masterminds, you get a Hero Point when a character flaw comes up. Hero Points allow you to do a lot of fun things, but I never realized that this mechanic also encourages the players to keep track of their flaws.

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Otaku

Otaku




11th Oct 2017, 10:17 AM

I'm glad more systems are catching up. ;)

Yeah, yeah, I sound like a smug git putting it that way, but it is tempered by most of the stuff I enjoyed that already put more of an emphasis on role-playing having other flaws, like receiving critical praise but not the sales to go with it, or how it is at its most popular when being used to... replicate D&D within the scope of its own rules. XP

SO seriously, I am thrilled more games have features like Disadvantages or Flaws or whatever you wish to call them and they are becoming more and more integrated into role-playing as opposed to conditions on a build point "loan" or "grant" where you hoped the GM forgot the finer points of the conditions/terms. XP

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Guest




11th Oct 2017, 10:53 AM

the rule for my GM was "you take a flaw if you want, but 1)you have to be able to justify through your character backstory (or something that happened during the campaign) why he'd have this flaw, and 2) whatever flaw you take the GM can (and by can, he mean will, at the most terrible time) use it against you. He also knew to reward us when we roleplayed our character flaws accordingly, and sentence if we tried to cheat our way out of it.

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terrycloth




11th Oct 2017, 1:54 PM

My rule was 'they have to be purely mechanical flaws that affect your stats so that I don't have to remember them, with maybe ONE exception per person'. Also, no more than 40 points because that's the standard character creation rule in GURPS.

This guy came back with over 200 points of flaws, most of them redundant psychological flaws that cancelled each other out (or so he claimed). "That is the exact opposite of what I told you!" He tried again and managed to reduce it to 150, but that was his final offer because any less and he 'couldn't play his character'.

And he used the extra points for stupid stuff that was useless, so it wasn't like I could complain that he was overpowered.

Ugh. He was a fun GM but a real pain as a player.

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Spare Parts




11th Oct 2017, 4:35 PM

Flaws canceling each other out? Sounds like mutual exclusivity to me. I like flaws making each other so much worse. Berserker rage (also triggered by psychological distress) coupled with a mild phobia (triggered by something common) makes for some fun times. The phobia has dire results while the rage sets in out of combat a lot.

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Guest




11th Oct 2017, 4:53 PM

In a group with which i played long ago, We had one guy who tried to take flaw thats would cancel each other, the GM rulled some of thoses out, but let him keep some, and then proceeded to come up with absurd, but fun, way to temporarily "dispense" the character of one of his flaws, "coincidentally" at the moment when the one it was suposed to cancel hit the hardest. :'D

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Poker




3rd Dec 2017, 7:43 PM

i actually do the oposite as it's easier for me to remember "this guy is playing a character who have this particularity" than to remember what the flaws do to it's numbers.

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Super_Big_Mac

Super_Big_Mac




11th Oct 2017, 4:03 PM

I played up a flaw based entirely around backstory stuff, and did so often and well enough that my GM actually granted me a feat (I hadn't seen the flaw in any books, and would just make Will saves with a -3 whenever it felt appropriate.) He told me to try and use actual Flaws if I ever want to do something similar, as it's easier to keep track of for both of us.

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Anvildude




11th Oct 2017, 3:28 PM

I prefer doing 'take a strength, leave a flaw' style stuff- a flaw with a built-in strength, or a perk with a built-in flaw.

My blind Earth-Sorcerer, for example. Had Tremorsense out to 60 feet instead. Now, Tremorsense is a big boon, and negated a lot of the problems with blindness, but at the same time, things got... traded. For instance, I couldn't see at all past that distance, while my sighted party members could. I couldn't read, unless I could feel the letters (or used special magic ink and the 'read magic' spell). And while I was immune to a Gorgon's gaze, and could sense through closed doors, I was absolutely useless in the fights against flying enemies or giant spiders descending from cavern roofs.

So I like trades, more than flaws. Fat guy has more health or armour, but lower stamina. Person with kleptomania is also good at appraising things. That sort of stuff.

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